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All posts tagged Wealth Building

In the Interim: Thoughts from a 20-Something Adult (?)

Hey friends,

I know I’m a little late to the party, but I recently read #GIRLBOSS by Sophia Amoruso, and I wanted to share my thoughts with you. From my previous post you might have gathered that I often feel overwhelmed in the face of making major life decisions that involve money or the Way Far Future. A quick poll of my inner circle of friends reveals that I’m not the only one struggling with these concerns; from my newly married couple-friends who are apartment/house-hunting , to my other friends who are considering a return to school to boost their careers, there are a multitude of decisions that I and my friends need to make now that will ultimately impact the quality of our lives later on.

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In the Interim: Thoughts from a 20-Something Adult (?)

After graduating from physician assistant (PA) school in February of this year, and successfully landing myself a job at a relatively busy hospital, I find myself with an awkward amount of time that I need to fill before I start my permanent position. In the beginning, I reveled in having the ability to sleep in and catch up on the sleep that I had sorely missed during my schooling. I revisited old hobbies of mine, dusting off long-forgotten yarn projects and other crafts. When that became tedious, I turned to working on my physical fitness, since I have the stamina of an aged, wet noodle. This led to numerous walks with borrowed pooches and breath-taking views of Wollaston Beach at dusk.

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So you want to invest and build wealth in real estate huh? You’ve heard stories about other people who’ve purchase rental real estate and made a good living and now you want to do the same? I can tell you that getting started in real estate isn’t difficult it just requires the right state of mind and a prolonged focus. There are many very intelligent people that completely understand real estate and the benefits of investing but avoid the venture due to lack of patience. These people are looking for instant gratification and that’s not something real estate can bring. Success in this business require a long-term mind set and the ability to see into the future. It requires a sacrifice of time, energy and money today for a greater amount of all three down the road.

Answer the questions below to gage whether you’re ready to dive into the world of investing.  There are no right or wrong answers and no grade, but this quick test will help you understand whether investing is the right path for you.

1. Are you a patience person? When you decide you want something do you go after it aggressively?

2. Do you tend to get discouraged when things do go exactly as planned?

3. Do you take rejection to heart? When someone tells you “no” do you ask someone else?

4. Can you picture the life you want 5-10 years from now or are you more focused on today?  

5. Are you willing to give up some of your time and energy today and become a student of the market?

Real estate investing isn’t for everyone and not everyone that enters this industry will make it down the path to wealth.  It’s a tough road but for those who can stay on it long enough they’ll be able to build the type of wealth they’ve only heard about in those above mentioned stories.

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I wrote a post a last week about building long-term wealth and had a few readers respond with questions. You can view the post with the following link. (http://mandrellco.com/building-long-term-wealth-real-estate/) One of the questions I received was concerning how to quickly calculate a property’s cash flow and expenses, … so I wanted to share the form I use to accomplish this. You can download the form below and I’ve also provided some quick notes on a few of the forms line items.                

 Note: The attached form uses annual amounts but I will use monthly figures for my examples

Total Gross Income:   Gross income is the total amount of income the property is producing. This will include income from rents, laundry, storage, parking, and any other sources connected to the property.

Vacancy Allowance: It’s assumed that your property will not stay occupied 100% of the year. People will move out and new people will come in. Vacancy allowance is the estimated portion of the year where you do not have a tenant paying you rent. I did not include vacancy allowance in the example from my previous post to avoid making calculation more difficult than needed. If we had included vacancy allowance I would have used the national average rate of 8% and multiplied that with my gross income of $4500.

Effective Gross Income: Effective Gross is Total Gross Income minus Vacancy Allowance ($4500 – $360=$4140)  

Net Operating Income:  NOI is simply your Effective Gross Income minus your Total Expenses.

Debt Service: Your debt service is your total monthly principal and interest payments on your mortgage. Many times borrowers chose to combine (escrow in) their taxes and insurance, while this cash flow sheet breaks these expenses into separate categories. The reason this is done is because your mortgage is a “variable expense” so to speak. If one investors puts down 20% and finances the property over 15 years and another investors places down 3.5% and finances it over 30 years, their payments will be complete different. Taxes and insurance will not vary from investor to investor, so they must be removed and shown in their own expense category to get total picture of what the investments true expenses are.  

Hope this helps!

Free Cash Flow Analysis Form

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Real estate is an excellent investment vehicle for building wealth, especially here in Massachusetts where we have a large number of multifamily buildings. The 3 family home, as an investment tends to make a ton of sense when it comes to the balance between the purchase price of the building and rental income you can achieve from one of these buildings.  Let’s take a quick look at a recent purchase made by one of our clients.

Purchase Price:  $500K    Down Payment: $100K    Mortgage: 15 Fixed @ 4%

Expenses: (Mortgage, Taxes, Insurance, Water, & Misc):  $3,800    Income:  $4500 ($1500 * 3 Units)

Monthly Cash Flow:  $700

$700 monthly cash flow is great, but the real financial benefits come from the long-term effects of this investment on my client’s portfolio. If you noticed above she opted to take a 15 year loan and pay off her debt sooner than the typical 30 year plans. Let’s take a look at where she is financially in 15 years:

Debt Pay Down:

As you make your monthly mortgage payments the principal balance is slowly decreasing. This debt pay down is called the “amortization” of your mortgage. If you look at a mortgage amortization chart (which is usually provided with your loan documents) you can pinpoint what the principal balance on your loan will be at any given point over the term of the loan. This assumes you are making all your payments on time and only paying the minimum amount due each month. As your mortgage balance decreases your net worth increases. With the above scenario my client is done paying or has “fully amortized” this loan in 15 years.  She will receive a discharge notice from the bank and no further payments will be due. Her tenants will have essentially paid off a 400k debt for her and increased her net worth by that much.

Property Appreciation:

Appreciation is the increase in your property’s value year over year.  The rate of appreciation you will receive in future years is impossible to predict but history tells us that property values tend to increase at a rather consistent rate over time. Removing recent market adjustment years (2006-2011), US real estate values have appreciated at a rate of approximately 6% annually, with Massachusetts falling right in line with average rate. If we take our property from above with a current market value of $500k and assume we achieve at least a 5% rate of appreciation over the next 15 years, we would be looking at a property value of $1,039,000.

Rent Appreciation:

Rent prices tend to move upward with inflation. Just like the cost of bread and gas, rent rental values always go up. With that said, the same $4500 per month ($54,000 annually) my client is collecting in rents today will be much higher in the future.  If we assumed rents in her building also increased at a rate of 5% yearly, she will be collecting $9,355 per month after 15 years. That’s over $100K annually in passive income!

Net Worth & Passive Income:

If you take these numbers as a whole, thats when things start to get exciting. 15 years from now this mortgage will be completely paid off and it will have been done by someone other than my client. Her tenants are paying off the debt every month with their rent checks. Not only is she getting the debt paid off but she will be putting $700 (or more) per month back into her pocket over the next 15 years. At the end of the 15 year term her debt will be gone and her rents have now grown to $9355 per month, which she can put in her pocket or use to go out and purchase other investments.  Her property has also appreciated to over 1 million in value which will be a major contribution to her total net worth number!

Building Wealth Takes Time:

My client is not very special …in the sense that anyone can follow this wealth building model and achieve exactly what she has done in the past and is in the process of doing again. Don’t have $100k to invest? You don’t need it. There are ways to achieve the same with a whole lot less. Don’t have time for tenant issues? Hire a property management company! With this model my client is achieving $700 in cash flow. I’m sure for $700 per month you can find a company to manage your tenant issues. Long story short… there is really no reason why this can’t be done by anyone.  15 years is not a walk in the park but the earlier you start the sooner you’ll get there. If you only had this one building and invested in nothing else during the next 15, you would still have a net worth of over a million dollars and earning over a $100k in passive rental income! Imagine if you bought several of these investments!

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