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All posts tagged Selling

Meet Your Mattapan, Hyde Park & Roxbury Real Estate Expert

Denisha McDonald is your local real estate specialist for Roxbury, Dorchester, Mattapan and Hyde Park areas. She has a deep understanding of the community, it’s people and the real estate in these particular neighborhoods. Watch Denisha’s short introduction video!

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What Does It Cost To Buy A Duplex Or Triple Decker In Roslindale?

Roslindale Multifamily & Rental Market Data

Are you a current or aspiring landlord in Massachusetts? No matter how many years you have in the rental business, fully understanding your local market is one the most important thing you can do to ensure your long-term success.  Receiving regular market updates will help you determine when’s it time to buy and when it’s time to sell. It will also allow you to see what your apartments rent for in comparison to your neighbors. Should you be increasing rents?

Here are Roslindale’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics for the month of September.  

Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 16

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 2,600.00   

Average Listing Price: $618,352  

Average DOM (Days on Market): 37.87 Days 

Average Sales Price: $628,680

Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $1,753

Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $1,858

Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $2,334

Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $2,675

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!  

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

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What Does It Cost To Live In Randolph?

Want to know what’s happening with Randolph home sales and rentals?

Here are Randolph’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics over the last 6 months.

Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 6

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 3,174.00

Average Listing Price: $471,735

Average DOM (Days on Market): 14.87 Days

Average Sales Price: $495,680

Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $1,300

Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $1,658

Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $2,121

Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $2,350

Want to see sales data for another local area?

I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

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4 Task You Must Complete to Maximize Your Property Sales Price


 

Hi All, I Just want to go over briefly four things that you can do when you’re selling your multi-family. Your two, your three, your four unit, your residential multi-family property. Four things that you can do to make sure that you maximize the price. That you get the most. When putting that property on the market, you walk away with the most money that you possibly can as a potential seller.

Four things that you can potentially do. Let’s start with number one. You can provide a unit vacant. Why would it be beneficial to you as a seller to provide a unit vacant when selling your multi-family? You have two potential buyers when you’re selling, let’s say a three family property. You have the owner-occupant buyer. Someone who’s going to purchase the property, move into the property, move into one of the units and rent out the other two to supplement their income. Then you have the investor. An owner-occupant buyer is almost always going to pay more for the property, their primary residence, the place that they’re going to live, than a potential investor.

Investor’s going to come in and they’re going to analyze the numbers specifically and strictly and say, “Does this property make sense from a financial standpoint and if it does or it doesn’t, I’m going to make my decision based on that.” An owner-occupant buyer is going to move in and make it their own. It’s the place that they live. There’s an emotional attachment to that place. By you providing a unit vacant, you’re essentially allowing them to move in. Without a unit vacant, essentially if all three units are occupied, only an investor can buy that property from you. Basically you’re eliminating the owner-occupant opportunity if all three units are tenant occupied and there’s not a space for an owner-occupant.

The first thing I would say is I wouldn’t go out and necessarily kick a tenant out, but if there’s a tenant moving out and you’re considering selling somewhere around that same time, you know you have a lease expiring in three or four months, it may be a good time to say let’s put the property on the market while I have this potential vacancy and move in at that time.

Number two. Make obvious repairs. If there are some things that need to be done, you are going to maximize your selling price by making sure that the property is shown in it’s best light. That seems obvious to some people but many people don’t do it prior to selling. Making sure that any appliances that are broken, light fixtures, front door, back door, the front porch, back decks, making sure that those things that are quite obvious as soon as you walk up to the building or as soon as you walk inside a unit, this is clearly not the way it should be. Making sure that those things are done prior to putting your house on the market or prior to putting that property on the market is going to maximize your sale.

Prepare for a spring or summer sale. If you are, let’s say it’s January, 2017 and you are moving into, considering selling, you have about three or four months before that spring market hits, that April, May, you really want to preparing your property for that spring marker or that summer market coming up. The reason you want to ideally sell in the spring or the summer, you have a larger pool of buyers at that particular time. Investors are going to be around all year round. But your owner-occupant buyers, if they’re renting an apartment right now and considering buying, their leases typically end sometime during the summer months. You’re going to have a much larger pool of buyers. People typically like to move during the summer when things are easier and not moving in the snow, especially in a place like New England. Preparing yourself mentally, getting your documentation ready, letting your tenants know about the sale, and making sure that you’re getting those things done during the winter months so when the spring and summer rolls around that your house or your property is prepared for that sale.

Last but not least, overpricing your property. Don’t overprice your property. Price it, I would say accordingly. Talk to your realtor, pull comparable sales, what’s going on in the neighborhood, what makes sense for this particular property compared to other sales. When you overprice the property, what you’ll end up with is potentially a stale listing. A stale listing is something that’s been sitting out there for 60, 90 days and now it’s not getting as much attention as it should be. When you do that you actually tend to get a lower sales price then you would have if you just priced the property appropriately from the beginning and sold it as quickly as possible to the best buyers during this spring or summer market.

Again, providing a unit vacant you’re going to get more money from an owner-occupant than you are from a potential investor. Making the obvious repairs. Making sure that your property is presentable and showing in the best light. Preparing for that spring or summer sale and not overpricing your property. Making sure that your property comes on the market at a reasonable and fair price compared to other similar properties that are selling on the market. If you do these four things, you’ll be sure that your sales price is maximized and you’ll get the most money and put the most money in your pocket after the property is sold.

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Is The Dorchester Multi-family Market Cooling Off? Check Out These Numbers

If you know anything about Dorchester real estate, you probably know it’s been on fire for the last couple years…especially the 2-4 family buildings. But is the market cooling now? Are we at the peak? Check out the sales and rental numbers over the last 6 month and determine for yourself.

Here is Dorchester’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics for the last 6 months.

Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 104

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 3,362

Average Listing Price: $599,789

Average DOM (Days on Market): 51.58 Days

Average Sales Price: $593,745

Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $1,645

Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $1,972

Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $2,211

Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $2,564

 
I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

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4 Documents You Must Have During A Successful Home Sale

I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

I want to talk to you today a little bit about documentation, preparing to sell your multifamily property, any property in between two and 20 units. Typically, we’re talking about two and four units, residential property, but this also applies to larger investment properties as well. Documentation, getting ready to sell. What are you thinking about? What are the documents that you need to gather? I’m giving you right here is four sets of documents that your potential buyers are going to want to ask you about, your realtor is going to ask you about, so you might as well go ahead and get these documents prepared as early as possible.

The first set of documents that you want are your tenant leases and the rent roll. You don’t necessarily have to provide the actual physical copy of your leases to your potential buyers, but what they’re going to want to know is when did those leases start, when do those leases expire, and then the second half of that is what each tenant is paying. That’s a big part of selling a multifamily. It’s a big factor when potential buyers are buying multifamily, are am I going to be able to move into a unit? If one of the tenants are below-market rent, when does that lease expire and when am I now able to increase the rent. Making sure that you’re collecting that information, understanding when are your leases expiring and what each tenant is paying and being able to provide that information to your realtor, so your realtor can provide that to potential buyers.

The second set of items that you’re going to want to collect are systems warranties. Did you recently have the roof changed? Did you recently install a new heating system or a new AC system? Appliances, did you recently install appliances into any of the units within the buildings and are they still within warranty? That is adding value. If you are able to take those warranties and provide those to the new potential buyer and show this refrigerator was installed last year and it’s still under warranty, that is a great way to provide value, so you really want to go out and see if you can collect any warranties that you have from roof to heating systems to appliances, anything else. Systems maintenance. When was the last time that your heating system was serviced? If you have a good maintenance schedule in place, you should have been documenting that over the years and being able to turn that over to a potential buyer is going to create value and give the buyer a sense of ease knowing that the systems were maintained over the years. That is something else that you should be looking for in preparation for selling your multifamily house.

Last but not least, we live in Massachusetts and then throughout the country, 1978 lead paint law. Lead paint is no longer used after the year 1978, but within Boston and a lot of the areas surrounding us, these homes were built 1910, 1920s, so a lot of them still do contain lead paint. If you have lead paint documentation, if your apartments have been lead paint certified, this, again, creates a lot of value, creates a lot of comfort with your potential buyers and if you can provide that documentation right up front to show them that that’s not something that they don’t have to worry about any longer, they can now move children under the age of six in and not have to worry about the lead paint hazard. That is going to create a lot of value for you. It’s going to help you potentially get a quicker sale and for a higher sales price in making sure that you are also collecting that lead paint documentation as well. Four things, tenant lease and rent rolls, warranties, maintenance schedules, and then a lead paint documentation. If you provide those four sets of items, you should be in really good shape to get your property sold.

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Why Your Rental Property Is Worth $50k Less Than Your Neighbors

 I often get the question, “why is my property worth less than my neighbor’s? My neighbor’s house sold for,” in this particular situation, “$600,000. My house is listed at the same thing but I’m not getting the attention or it’s not moving as quickly as my neighbor’s home.” I am going to try answer that question really briefly. Hopefully you like my little graphic here. I am really proud of myself, able to put this together. Not that artistic so it took me a little bit. Hopefully it shows the point pretty clearly.

In this particular instance we’re talking about multi-families. We are talking about, in this particular model, two triple-decker side-by-side. Let’s assume all else is equal. They were built the same year. In the same condition. The tenant base is just as strong. All the systems are working just as effectively or efficiently as one another. All else being equal, the only thing that differs between these two properties is the rental income being produced.

In property number one in our example, you have three units. Each one of them is collecting $1500 per unit. Let’s assume they’re three bedrooms. In property number two, again, all else being equal, you have three bedrooms collecting $2000 a piece. The difference typically that we find between buildings that are almost identical selling for two different prices is the rental income that’s being produced. When buyers buy a rental property, when they buy a multi-family building, a lot of times their intention is to … and not a lot of times, most times, I would say all times, their intention is to collect as much rent as possible to help them reduce their expenses. A lot of times their mortgage qualification relies on the rental income that comes in to help them qualify for a larger purchase.

In this particular example, all else being equal, this particular model, this particular property is worth $550,000. This one is worth roughly $600,000 because of the differences in income. Often you have the seller of property number one saying, “well my house, I’m putting my house on the market and you’re telling me it’s worth $50,000 less than the house two doors down that’s almost identical to mine that sold for 600. Well I know my neighbor and I talked to my neighbor and they’re getting 600 for their property. Why is my house sitting on the market and it’s not getting the attention when we’ve listed it at the same price?”

Again, there are a lot of different factors that go into selling property. The condition, the atmosphere, maybe this person sold in a nice summer market and this is coming onto winter. The rental income is not the only factor that goes into the final price. A lot of times whether you’re talking about multi-family properties, especially the triple-deckers that we have here in New England, the rental income is a big factor and the more rental income that you have being generated by the building, typically the higher the sales price of that building compared to similar buildings.

The point we’re trying to make is more money increases value. More money equals more value. The second point is staying up with the market. Staying up with the market. Staying in touch with what’s going on in your local rental market. By that I mean, typically the reason that you find a difference between these two buildings and what they’re renting for is this person has had long-term tenants. Very good thing, but while these tenants were staying in place, this landlord never systematically went back and increased the rents. The thought process is, and again, to no fault of this person, it’s very common that this happens, is my tenants are great. They’re great people. They don’t give me any trouble. I just want to keep them in place and I want to keep them happy. I’m not going to touch the rent. As long as they’re paying the bills. It is paying the bills that I’m covered. I don’t need much out of it.

Ten years down the road, fifteen years down the road when they’ve gone … when it’s time to now sell, this person has kept up with the market, systematically said, “okay, the three bedroom apartments are now renting for $1800, now they’re renting for $1900.” As tenants move out and new tenants are being replaced, or the tenants that are in place stay there and he systematically increasing two, three percent over time to keep up with the current market rents. When it’s time for these two individuals to sell, they’re cashing out, they’re retiring, they’re moving on, they’re trading up, whatever it is, this person now, despite how nice he was to his tenants or she was to her tenants, over the years is now put themself in a tough situation compared to the person who kept up with the market.

At the end of the day, buyers are going to look at what the property is producing and say, “I’m going to make my determination of value based on,” not solely, but again, in large part on what I can get back. Even if I occupy this unit, we’re looking at it from an investor standpoint, even if we looked at it from an own occupant standpoint and we said we took away this rent, we took away this rent. I now have $4000 to help me with my mortgage. In now have $3000 over here to help me with my mortgage. I can actually not only afford to pay more according to my mortgage broker, but it makes sense for me to pay more for this stream of income. That is exactly what buyers are purchasing. A stream of income.

You as a seller should over the years understand that you want to be systematically raising your rents, systematically increasing your rents, not to be troublesome to your tenants but to make sure when that sale comes sometime in the future that you are prepared for it and that the value of your building has been maximized because the rents have been maximized.

I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

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How Long Will It Take For My Home To Sell?

What is your typical selling timeline and why it’s important to you as a potential seller? If you’re selling a property, you really need to know what’s the next steps and What am I looking forward to. How soon do I need to move out of this property? How soon do I need to turn over the keys to the new buyer?

That’s what I’m going to try to lay out for you. Hopefully it’s pretty clear through my timeline sketch here. When you first put a piece of property on the market and you tell your realtor, let’s go ahead and let’s sell this property, the first thing that your realtor is responsible for doing is marketing and selling the property. Your realtor’s going out and they’re putting the property on the MLS, on Zillow, on Trulia, these different marketing websites, they’re putting it on their own company website. They’re going out there and they’re doing open houses, doing private showings. They’re trying to find that potential buyer for you.

Once that potential buyer is found, and by found what we mean is, a potential buyer has seen the property through an open house, through some type of marketing venue and they’ve now placed an offer on the property. You realtor at the time of receiving that offer is going to come to you, they’re going to negotiate with the potential buyer on your behalf to get the highest sales price with the best terms possible. Once you, the seller, and that potential buyer have agreed to a price, agreed to terms, we call that day one. That is your offer to purchase day, that is the day that the offer, or OTP, has been accepted. That starts your timeline.

You have agreed to sell for a particular price, the buyer has agreed to buy for a particular price, which starts your 45 day approximate timeline. From there, in a typical situation your buyer is going to go into their 10 day home inspection window. Most offers are submitted with a 10 day, standard 10 day window and this allows the buyer to now enter your property, and to your tenant units and to, if it’s a multi-family enter the property to inspect the home with a licensed home inspector, with a contractor, to make sure that the systems are working, to make sure that the roof is okay, to make sure that the windows operate.

They’re going to do a full inspection to make sure that the property is truly what was being presented to them and it is in good working shape. At the end of that 10 day period, you can go with the buyer, it can go in a couple different ways, the buyer can say, I love the property and I want to move forward. That’s what we hope that the buyer does. The buyer can say, there were some things I didn’t really agree with at the potential property, this is not the right property for me, I’m going to back out of this transaction, or the buyer can say yes, I like the property but the price that we agreed to on day one, I don’t feel like that price is appropriate any longer.

The heating system is not working the way it should be, or it’s working but it’s much older than I anticipated. The roof is fine, but it’s much older, it’s 20 years into it’s life and is going to need to be replaced. The buyer has three options, either back out, move forward or renegotiate after that 10 day period. They’ve done their home inspection, let’s say hypothetically we’ve renegotiated and you both, the seller and the buyer, have come to an agreement on price. After that, you as a seller, the buyer, would both hire attorneys and you would go into what’s called the purchase and sales contract, or P & S.

What that does, it solidifies the deal and puts all of the offer information and the final price with the terms into a nice contract that the attorneys can use and it helps us move forward into the sale with a more concrete contract than the offer and purchase. The buyer is also going to put down a larger deposit this time and say yes, this is the property that I want, I’m now going to pursue my mortgage. You’ve had day one, you’ve had your home inspection period, we’ve renegotiated the price, we’ve gone and we’ve hired two attorneys, we’re gone onto purchase and sales.

The buyer is moving forward, the seller is moving forward. Now for you as a seller, from that day 15 to day 45, it’s about a 30 day window, I’ll describe to you a little bit about what the buyer is doing. The buyer in this particular situation is putting their mortgage together. They’re going back to the mortgage company and they’re saying, I found the property that I want, I’m submitting my taxes now, I’m submitting my other documents and the mortgage company is processing all that information to make the distribution, to pay you for the property and to put a lien on the buyer’s property.

You on the other hand, you as the seller, are working with your realtor to do three main things. One is the bank of the buyer is going to send out an appraiser to appraise the property to make sure that the property is worth the amount of money that you have agreed upon. Your realtor is going to make sure that the appraiser has access to the property and that the appraisal is properly done for the bank. The realtor, your realtor is also going to work with the local fire department to make sure that you have a smoke certificate.

Any time a property is being sold, the property needs to come with a certificate from the Boston or local municipality saying that the smoke detectors are in working order. Your realtor is going to help you cover that and you also have to get a final water reading. What are you paying for water bills, at the closing day you want to make sure that all your water bills have been paid and leaving the new buyer, the new owner of that home with a clean balance, a clean water lien with the local municipality or local water department.

Day one, day 10, day 15 and then finally we get to day 45, sometimes there is delays depending on holidays, sometimes it’s bumped up depending on if the buyer can submit their mortgage documents sooner but it’s typically a 45 day timeline from the time that you receive that offer to the time that you get to closing day. At the closing table you would exchange keys with the buyer, you would get the check from the closing attorney for the balance, assuming that your mortgage will be paid off, all the liens will be paid off on the property and whatever is left over you would receive as the potential seller.

Again, when you’re selling a property you typically have about a 45 day timeline from the day that you receive an offer, that offer to purchase is accepted to the day that you close and the new buyer is now the owner of that potential property.

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Do You Know What A Multi-family In Quincy Sells For? Check Out The #’s!

Quincy Multifamily Sales & Rental Market Report
Are you a current or aspiring landlord in Massachusetts? No matter how many years you have in the rental business, fully understanding your local market is one the most important thing you can do to ensure your long-term success. Receiving regular market updates will help you determine when’s it time to buy and when it’s time to sell. It will also allow you to see what your apartments rent for in comparison to your neighbors. Should you be increasing rents? Is now a good time to sell?

Here is Quincy’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics for the last 6 months.
Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 80
Average Living Area by Square Feet: 2,523.00
Average Listing Price: $642,735 (What seller asked for the property)
Average DOM (Days on Market): 45.11 Days (How long it took to sell)
Average Sales Price: $632,778 (What buyers actually paid for the home)
Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $1,445
Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $1,772
Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $2,133
Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $2,533

I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!
Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

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4 Task You Must Complete Before Selling Your Boston Rental Property

Hi guys. Willie Mandrell with the Mandrell Company and today I want to talk to you about five things that you must do prior to selling your multi-family property, your 2- to 4-unit residential or larger investment property. Here are five things that you must do or consider prior to putting that property on the market.

Number one, and the most important thing, is keeping your tenants informed. Nothing can spoil a sale faster than having a tenant who was uninformed about the sale and now objects to that sale, is uncooperative in terms of letting potential buyers in or coordinating with your realtor. You really want to keep your tenants informed about the sale and educating them about the process prior, letting them know that if they’re under lease currently, their leases are going to be respected by the new buyers. If they are worried about rent increases, having that conversation with them prior.

I think the most important thing is also informing them about showing times. We’re going to be having an open house on Saturdays and Sundays from 11 to 1. The realtor is also going to be contacting you for showings in between on Tuesday nights or Wednesday nights. We’re going to try to keep it to a minimum, as not to disturb your quality of living. We don’t really want to interrupt your dinner time or special family events. Keeping that open line of communication with your tenants is going to help the sale move a lot more smoothly than having them uninformed. Making sure you keep your tenants informed, number one.

Have a pre-sale inspection. This is not an absolute necessity, but it can really help move the sale along. If you have a home inspector come in prior to actually putting the house on the market, the home inspector will tell you which appliances are not working correctly, which plugs are not grounded, does your roof look a little older, does the foundation need some type of pointing? If you have a pre-sale inspection, you can learn a lot about the property that you might not have otherwise known, and give you an opportunity to address some of these issues prior to putting the house on the market, and can make the sale go a lot more smoothly than having the reverse happen and having the buyer do the home inspection, and then them coming up with issues and the potential sale falling apart later on.

Number three. Check your smokes. If you are operating with a two- to three- or four-family residential property, the sale cannot take place unless the Boston or local municipal fire department comes in and assures that your smoke detectors are in the proper working order and the proper position within the home as well. Making sure that you’re going around and checking your smokes, that they’re ten feet from every bedroom, that if you own a three-family or above, that the hallways, the common area, the back and front hallways, plus the basement are hardwired to an electric panel. Talk to your realtor about the requirements for the smoke inspection. They are most likely going to coordinate with the municipality, the local fire department and make sure that smoke inspection happens for you. Making sure your smokes are in good working condition, because the sale of that property will not happen if they are not.

Number four, very important as well, talking to your CPA about the sale of that property. If you’re selling that property, are you taking the cash and doing something with it? Are you cashing in? Is it closer to retirement? Your CPA is going to be able to advise you on the tax consequences. The federal government wants their money. The state and local governments also have a stake in the sale of your property as well. Talking to your CPA will give you a good understanding of what’s going to happen with the cash after the sale of that property. It’s something you really want to do and really understand prior, so you can make accommodations. Maybe you want to minimize your tax liability, and talk to your CPA about a potential 1031 exchange, an exchange from one investment property to another. Talking to your CPA is very important.

Last but not least, is you want to talk to an attorney, a good attorney. If you don’t have an attorney that you work with, not everyone does, you can get an excellent real estate lawyer or attorney suggestion from your real estate agent. We, as real estate agents work with attorneys on a regular basis, and we can refer you to someone good that’s in your area that knows your real estate. The reason you want to do that is you really want to have a relationship because as you’re going along and there’s certain paperwork, the offer form, the purchase and sales, the closing itself, the attorney might want to get power of attorney to sign for you at the closing, so you don’t necessarily need to attend. There’s a lot of legal aspects of selling property that you want to talk to your real estate attorney with as well.

THere’s the five things that if you do these five things, you’ll be in very good shape to have your sale move smoothly. Keeping your tenants informed, getting a pre-sale inspection, check your smokes, talk with your CPA, and hire a lawyer. If you do those five things, you’ll be in very good shape for a smooth sale of your multi-family property.

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West Roxbury Multifamily Sales & Rental Market Data

Are you a current or aspiring landlord in Massachusetts? No matter how many years you have in the rental business, fully understanding your local market is one the most important thing you can do to ensure your long-term success.  Receiving regular market updates will help you determine when’s it time to buy and when it’s time to sell. It will also allow you to see what your apartments rent for in comparison to your neighbors. Should you be increasing rents? Is now a good time to sell?

Here are West Roxbury’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics for the last 6 months.

Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 9

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 2,910.00

Average Listing Price: $675,735

Average DOM (Days on Market): 68.11 Days

Average Sales Price: $677,778

Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $1,577

Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $2,004

Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $2,356

Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $2,957

I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

Read more

East Boston Multifamily Sales & Rental Market Data

Are you a current or aspiring landlord in Massachusetts? No matter how many years you have in the rental business, fully understanding your local market is one the most important thing you can do to ensure your long-term success.  Receiving regular market updates will help you determine when’s it time to buy and when it’s time to sell. It will also allow you to see what your apartments rent for in comparison to your neighbors. Should you be increasing rents?

Here are East Boston’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics for the last 6 months.  

Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 44

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 2,462.00

Average Listing Price: $615,435

Average DOM (Days on Market): 66.98 Days

Average Sales Price: $610,560

Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $1,677

Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $1,943

Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $2,307

Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $2,875

I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

http://www.EastBostonHomeValues.com

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Color Psychology for Home Staging

Do you like one color over another? Do you feel a different way depending on the color you see? There is a psychological response related to color choices. It is based on the mental and emotional effects it can have on a person. 

Warm colors: instantly grab people’s attention (red). Use this to draw buyer’s attention to a positive feature in your home. Use as an accent color. Yellow makes a home feel warm and inviting. A little 

Cool colors: It is relaxing and creates a spa like feeling depending on the shade. Green provides balance as it reminds people of nature. 

Neutral Colors: breaks up colors to let the eyes rest. 

Whites: Feeling of cleanliness,purity

Black: Authority and strength

Grey: Timeless, practical and provides perfect background for any color. 

For more resources and tips on how to prepare your home for sale, please do not hesitate to contact us.

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Your Home’s Been on the Market For How Long?

This blog is for my sellers in this crazy market. I want you to think of yourself as a homebuyer for a second… Would you pay more for a house if all the comparable homes in the area that have sold and others that are on the market are cheaper? What would make you choose the overpriced house?

Honest question because there are some people who willingly pay more for a home due to time constraints or a love for some specific feature in the home that they can’t live without. 

If there’s anything almost guaranteed to make your home sale experience a good or bad one, it will be price!

Price it correctly from the start and you’ll get offers in no time!

However, go with the “let’s see if there are buyers willing to pay that price” and as a home seller, you’ll undoubtedly draw the short straw!

How does a home seller know his home is overpriced?

The home is priced well-above neighboring properties for sale

“Of course, my home should be selling for more than some of my neighbors’ houses!”

As long as the market hasn’t spoken (i.e. no able & willing buyer and home seller have agreed on a mutually acceptable price), prices of properties in your neighborhood are just ASKING prices, but not given yet! As agents we base value on SOLD homes with a few adjustments to account for present market. If homes are listed and sitting in a hot market… that means they are overpriced.

The home isn’t seeing a steady stream of buyer showings

You agree on a list price, put your home on the market and nothing! No calls, no showing requests, nothing!! Other homes are on the market and accepting offers…what’s wrong? Well.. if you re the highest priced home in your neighborhood but clearly not new construction or newly remodeled… I think you know why.

The home hasn’t seen a single offer, despite months of marketing

If a home is priced right, there should be a lot of buyers knocking at your door (well, contacting your agent) and several showings. It should not take long for you to receive offers (within 30 days). If this is not your story… you should consider having a serious discussion with your agent and consider re-interviewing agents to sell your property.

The home has only seen ‘low-ball’ offers

The longer your home sits on the market, the greater the chance of low ball offers. All agents review days on market with their clients before submitting offers. If you have been on the market for over 30-40 days, expect less than asking, beyond that timeframe… even lower.

The real estate agent’s contract expired and the home is still on the market

When you agree to work with an agent, there is usually a start date and an end date to the contract. If you have not received offers by the conclusion of your contract… DO NOT RENEW with that agent. They did not fulfill their duties.  You also did not do your homework to understand the market and lower the price to what the market will bear.

Here at The Mandrell Company, we are honest and upfront. We provide honest numbers for home values. Some sellers choose other companies because our value was lower but we see that same home on the market months later and sometimes it sells for the price we told the seller but 5 months later. Had they listened, they would have had a sale months sooner.

For a complimentary value analysis and the opportunity to assist you in the sale of your home, please contact us to schedule your consultation. CONTACT@MANDRELLCO.COM or 617-297-8641.

 

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The Roxbury Real Estate market is experiencing a boom. Condo sales are through the roof and buyers cant seem to get enough. Single families and multifamilies are selling off market more than on market and being converted to condos because the demand is greatest. 

Mutli family home values have aggressively increased due to the high demand for rental units and the lure of condo conversions. MF homes were selling for $532,000 in 2014 and to date (keep in mind we are only in July) are selling for $879,000.

Multi Families 2014 2015 2016 (January to July)
# Sales 24 33 13
Average Sales Price $532,595 $574,782 $879,308 
Days on Market (DOM) 53 57 105

Half way through the year and condo sales have already matched the entire year of 2015 sales and surpassed that of 2014. Values have increased by $100,000. Savvy investors have taken notice and have been trying to meet the demand for luxury condos in the community. 

Condominiums 2014 2015 2016 (January to July)
# Sales 29 34 32
Average Sales Price $290,023 $404,094 $387,293 
Days on Market (DOM) 65 58 62

Single family sales have always been lower because they are hard to sell due to their large size. The average family does not want the responsibility of these massive Victorians. Savvy buyers have started converting them to multi-families to utilize the space. 

Single Families 2014 2015 2016 (January to July)
# Sales 12 14 7
Average Sales Price $435,975  $406,214   $444,964 
Days on Market (DOM) 63 94 43

For more information on the Roxbury real estate market, connect with your area specialist Terrance Moreau

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When you are preparing to sell a MultiFamily, Here are 8 things you should do to ensure a smooth transition and to limit surprises. 

  1. Hire a Certified Professional Accountant (CPA) who is well versed in real estate. You want to know what your tax consequences are when you sell. There are capital gains taxes associated and you want to know next steps before you begin the process.
  2. Talk to a Realtor who is familiar with your area and multi-family homes. It is not just about listing your home, they need to understand the intricacies of a multi-family and how rent, condition, location etc affects the value. Is it a buyer’s market or a seller’s market?
  3. Does it make sense to sell as condos? Boston is experiencing a real estate boom and oftentimes in some neighborhoods, it is more profitable to divide the property and sell as condos as opposed to selling as a multi-family.
  4. Informing tenants of the sale. You want to inform them as early as possible. You want to be respectful of your relationship because a disgruntled tenant can hinder the sale of your property. You want their cooperation in coordinating showings, assist them in providing information for relocating.
  5. Gather property Financials. Buyers want to know the additional cost associated with the property so they know if the numbers make sense
  6. Gather tenant lease information. The buyer will want to see the lease agreements. When do leases expire? Are they market rent rates or below market rents?
  7. Fix any major and minor repairs in home. You want building in best shape possible as first impressions are lasting. Also, home inspections are a time to renegotiate the price. If you do not want to renegotiate the price, repair as much as you can that makes sense (discuss with realtor) so that you get the strongest offers.
  8. Connect with a real estate attorney. You want to ensure your best interests are protected.

For more information and helpful tips, please follow our blog posts or connect with us on  facebook or email at contact@mandrellco.com

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Are you in the market to buy, rent or sell property in South End? Before you make a move, understanding the local market condition can make all the difference. We’ve outlined below exactly what’s happening with Condos in the area. All these number reflect what’s taken place over the last 6 months.

Condominium Listings
Total Condos SOLD: 251
Average Living Area by Square Feet: 1,148.33
Average Listing Price: $1,026,012
Average DOM (Days on Market):  36.49
Average Sales Price: $1,040,665

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to
Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales
Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will
be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!
Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

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Assessed Vs Appraised Vs Market Value| Which Do I Use?

How do we determine Value?
Many of our clients question how the value of their home was ascertained. They see various price quotes on Zillow, Public records, assessors office. All of these values are accurate but they serve very different purposes. It is important to understand what each number represents.

Assessed Value: Value determined by local municipality for tax purposes only. You pay property taxes based on this value. It has nothing to do with the resale value of your home. 

Appraised Value: An Appraiser is hired to determine value that banks are willing to lend on. Essentially, they want to find similar homes in the area that have sold and how much they sold for. They then compare your home to this home and assess whether your home is worth more or less. 

Market Value: What a buyer is willing to pay for the property. It is a combination of Appraised value, inventory, and demand. We understand that if there are several homes on the market listed around $500,000 but none of them are going under contract… these homes are more than a buyer is willing to pay. However, if homes at this price are going under contract within days/weeks, we know that buyers are willing to pay within this price for homes in the area. 

Determining the value of a home for Sale is a little more in depth than simply reviewing comparable homes. 

If you are interested in finding out the value of your home, please call today to schedule your FREE home value analysis! 

617-297-8641 or email us at contact@mandrellco.com

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10 Minute Room Transformation

Transforming your home to appeal to buyers does not always involve buying new furniture or expensive upgrades. This video shows that it can be as simple as decluttering and allowing natural light to enter. Buyers want to envision themselves in your home so your goal is to keep the room as simple as possible. 

Remove personalized items from the walls and tables

Remove throws, blankets, extra “Stuff” from sofas and chairs

Remove electronics that are not pertinent to the space 

Have a “catch all” bin to toss all the items you do not have a storage space for currently.

For more tips on how to stage your home on a budget, please feel free to connect with us online at contact@mandrellco.com or call us at 617-297-8641.

 

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There are some key differences between a short sale and a foreclosure in today’s real estate market. Although the economy is on the up and up, many people are still faced with this decision and we hope this video clarifies some of the differences to help you make an informed decision.

5 comparison criteria:

  1. Ability to obtain a mortgage in the future
  2. Effect on credit score and credit history
  3. Possible effects on security clearances
  4. Current and future employment
  5. Deficiency judgement

Short Sales impact you less severely than foreclosures!

If You have further questions on the process or would like to schedule a free, no obligation consultation, contact us at Contact@MadrellCo.com.

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The majority of Bostonians hate writing a check to their landlord every month, particularly if you live in Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, and Lower Mills areas. Sometimes you are cursed with noisy neighbors, or a super strict landlord who is looking for any reason to push you out so he can get the next highest paying tenant.

If any of the above applies to you, you probably want to buy a home…yesterday! Wanting to buy a home and being ready to do so are two different things. Are you financially ready for the monthly mortgage payment and budgeting for repairs?

Here are five signs that you’re not ready to buy a house just yet. But don’t fret; even if you are struggling with these financial issues, you can still become a homeowner. You’ll just need a bit of patience and improved financial skills.

Buying a home is expensive. You’ll need money for a down payment. If you are buying a home with an FHA loan, you’ll need a down payment of 3.5% of your home’s final purchase price, depending on your credit score. For a $300,000 home, that comes out to a down payment of $10,500. Thanks to Mass Housing, we have a 3% down payment program, but that still equates to $9,000. These numbers do not include closing costs, moving costs and other miscellaneous costs associated with moving into a new home. 

Closing costs are the fees that mortgage lenders, title insurers, attorneys and others charge you to originate your mortgage loan. We generally tell people plan for an additional 2% to cover these costs which equals $6,000.

It’s true that you can get help with some of these costs. You can use gift money from relatives, for example, to pay for all or part of your down payment. You might be able to convince a home’s seller to pay for all or part of the closing costs. In our current market, sellers are not inclined to do closing cost assistance unless you plan to purchase well above asking. 

What to Do

It’s best to start searching for a home only after you’ve saved enough money to cover a down payment and your estimated closing costs. Another option would be to look into programs available by your municipality that encourages home ownership by providing financial assistance. There are also some non-profits and other organizations that allow you to purchase with 0% or a rate lower than industry standard. (NACA.com)

Sign 2: Your Credit Score Is Bad

Your credit score is a key number when you’re applying for a mortgage. The best interest rates go to individuals with the best credit scores (above 740). The lower your score, the higher your interest rate and subsequently, the higher your monthly mortgage payment. You can purchase a home with a 580 credit score according to FHA guidelines but there are only a few lenders willing to accept a score this low. 

What to Do

First, order at least one of your three credit reports from AnnualCreditReport.com. You are entitled to one free copy of each of your three credit reports — maintained by the national credit bureaus of Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion — once every year. Once you get your report, read it carefully. It will list how much you owe on your credit cards and how much you owe on student loans and car loans. It will also list whether you have any late or missed payments during the last seven years. Those late or missed payments will send your credit score tumbling.

Next, order your FICO credit score. You can do this from the credit bureaus, too, but you’ll have to pay about $15 to do so. If your score is low, and there are negative marks on your credit report, it’s time to start a new history of paying all your bills on time. You also need to pay down as much of your credit card debt as possible. Both of these actions will steadily increase your credit score, though it could take months or even more than a year before your score recovers enough to make you a good candidate for a mortgage loan.

Sign 3: You Have Mount Everest of Credit Card Debt

Your debt-to-income ratio is another key number when it comes to buying a home. Lenders want your total monthly debts, including your estimated new mortgage payment, to equal no more than 43% of your gross monthly income. If your debt-to-income ratio is too high, you’ll struggle to earn approval for a mortgage. Some lenders will go as high as 50% due to the high cost of rent but generally, they want to see that you are not up to your eyeballs in debt.  

What to Do

I would say pay off your credit card debt but if you could have, you probably would have by now. I will STRONGLY recommend you always make more than your minimum monthly required payment. 

Sign 4: You Routinely Miss Your Monthly Payments

Making late payments, or missing payments completely, is a sure sign that you’re not ready for the financial responsibility of owning a home.

If you miss a mortgage payment by more than 30 days, your credit score will fall by 100 points or more. If you miss enough, you could lose your home to foreclosure. This is not like a landlord where you get warnings before it affects your credit… this is immediate. 

What to Do

Learn better financial habits before you apply for a mortgage. Set up reminders on your phone or computer alerting you when bills are due or use my favorite method… automatic payment. You could set aside one day each month dedicated to paying bills if you prefer the old fashioned paper method. Don’t apply for a mortgage until you’ve broken the habit of regularly missing your monthly payment due dates. 

Sign 5: You Don’t Have a Stable Job

You’ll need a steady, reliable stream of income if you use a mortgage to finance the purchase of a home. If you’re worried that you’ll lose your job, or your income is sporadic with no real pattern, you should probably NOT purchase a home. Generally, you need 2 years of full time work history. If you are self employed, you will need other documentation to help qualify you for a loan. 

What to Do

Find a job that is reliable and that pays you a stable income each month. Don’t take the risk that everything will work out. You don’t want missed mortgage payments on your credit reports. And if your job is unstable? You’ll greatly increase the risk of these red marks. If you are self employed or you operate on seasons… then you should think of yourself as a chipmunk… get good at storing away for the slow months. 

I hope this advice was helpful. We strive for our clients to be responsible home owners and want to ensure you will not be putting your home up for sale due to foreclosure. We want to help you BUILD WEALTH THROUGH REAL ESTATE!

 

For More information, please contact one of our agent specialists for your area or connect with us on… 

Dorchester Real Estate Agent

 

 

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In our next topic of conversation with Elizabeth Newcombe, we asked her what the first step in the home buying process is. Liz is involved in this process on a regular basis so getting her perspective on the topic is very beneficial. For anyone looking to purchase a home in the near future, this is a great short video on how to get started with the home buying process and what to expect throughout.

For more information on homes for sale in Attleboro, contact Elizabeth Newcombe at 413-834-8052

 

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Are you in the market to buy, rent or sell property in Jamaica Plain? Before you make a move, understanding the local market condition can make all the difference. We’ve outlined below exactly what’s happening with Multifamily properties in the area. All these numbers reflect what’s taken place over the last 6 months.

Multifamily Listings
Total Multifamily Buildings SOLD: 19
Average Living Area by Square Feet: 3,442.79
Average Listing Price: $1,053,368
Average DOM (Days on Market):  46.95
Average Sales Price: $1,038,290

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to
Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales
Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will
be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!
Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

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We are currently in the process of finishing (hopefully) a 3 family listing in Dorchester, which has had many speed bumps along the way. The owner of the triple decker decided to convert the property into three separate condos, going against the advice that he received from the listing agent. The problem with doing this was that he was therefore, involving many more parties to the buying process than there would be, had he just sold the property as a whole.

Five takeaways from this experience from an outside perspective:

• You need to value your time: Most people do not put a value on their time. Sometimes you need to ask yourself, “is this worth my time” and if your time could be better spent doing something else, then the answer is no. Doing everything yourself isn’t always the best option.
• It is better to hire out the work: Similar to the first takeaway, you hold up the project when you try to do everything yourself. Big picture, it is best to hire a contractor to do all the work. Yes, it is more expensive doing this, but the quality of work should be the best it can be and more importantly, this frees up your TIME.
• Listen to people’s advice: By going against the listing agent’s advice, the owner has added months and months onto the sale of his property. In hindsight, he ultimately admitted that he wished he took the original advice he received and sold the property “as is.”
• Don’t chase extra money: The decision to convert the property to three separate condos was due to the thought that by doing so, the owner could roughly an extra $100,000 off the sale. Even though this will be the end result, the extra six months the project took, along with many other factors, eats into those profits more that you realize until all is said and done.
• Learn from your mistakes: Everyone makes mistakes. The most important thing is that you learn from that mistake and do not make the same one again. Fortunately, the seller acknowledged his mistakes and mentioned that he would do things very differently if this situation arose again.

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Are you in the market to buy, rent or sell property in Brighton? Before you make a move, understanding the local market condition can make all the difference. We’ve outlined below exactly what’s happening with Condos in the area. All these number reflect what’s taken place over the last 6 months.

Condominium Listings
Total Condos SOLD: 93
Average Living Area by Square Feet: 869.96
Average Listing Price: $436,205
Average DOM (Days on Market): 29.59
Average Sales Price: $438,291

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to
Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales
Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will
be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!
Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

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