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All posts tagged real estate


10 Task Every Boston Landlord Must Complete To Find The Perfect Tenant

Cheryl Ricketts and Kate Brennan of The Mandrell Company take you through “10 Things Every Landlord Must Do Find Great Tenants”. While the information is geared toward Boston area landlords, must of the tips and tricks can be used anywhere in the state of Mass. For more information or for questions, you can contact them at Kate@MandrellCo.com or Cheryl@MandrellCo.com.

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Meet Your Mattapan, Hyde Park & Roxbury Real Estate Expert

Denisha McDonald is your local real estate specialist for Roxbury, Dorchester, Mattapan and Hyde Park areas. She has a deep understanding of the community, it’s people and the real estate in these particular neighborhoods. Watch Denisha’s short introduction video!

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Choosing A Real Estate Investing Partner? Consider These Factors 1st

Real estate can be expensive, a lot of work, and difficult to acquire. Partnering with another investor can be an excellent way to break into the business or continue your portfolio growth. But before you grab just any partner, here are four factors you must consider.

What are your timeline?
When investing in real estate with a business partner important consideration is your investment time. For example, if you are age 55 and investing for cash flow to supplement your retirement, while partnering with someone age 35 who is investing for long-term appreciation and portfolio growth, this partnership may not work out. You may be looking to sell the property and cash out in 10 years while your younger partner may be looking to hold on a bit longer. Not to say that you can only invest with people your age, but this is definitely a discussion you should have from the start of your venture. Even business partners of the same age should have the timeline discussion.

What are your investing goals?
Are you investing for cash flow or appreciation? Are you looking to invest in the city or suburbs? Locally or out of state investments? Are you looking to be active or passive with your rental property? Are you looking to buy a couple properties or build a large portfolio? These are some of the questions you and your potential business partner should ask each other before putting a deal together. If you, for instances, want to self manage a couple multifamily homes, while your potential partner wants to purchase a 50 unit building in a neighboring state, there is going to be a disconnect down the road.

Is this an ethical person?
There are a lot of choices to make when dealing with investment real estate and you must know that your partner is making decisions that are ethical, moral, and within the law. Is he or she creating a win-win when dealing directly with a seller? Does he or she avoid discriminatory practices when dealing with tenants? Is he or she truthful when dealing with loan officers? The things your partner does or doesn’t do will directly affect real estate and relationship you have together.

What do each of you bring to the table?
Experience, cash, and time are the three big factors that any one partner can bring to the investment table. You may have one partner who has years of experience investing in real estate, but lacks the additional investment capital for the current deal. If you partner this individual with someone who has cash and wants to learn more about the business, this may be a match made in heaven. What are your strengths and weaknesses? What about your potential partner? Have this critical conversation early on in the process. One person brings significantly more to the table than another partner, this doesn’t necessarily mean the partnership won’t work. Maybe the equity ownership within the property is divided accordingly.

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In this video, Patrick Wheeler of the Mandrell company shows you how to easily determine whether your real estate investment is profitable. He takes you through a simple to use rental property deal analyzer that allows you to determine return on investment, cap rate, cash on cash return and several other investment measures. Great investors know that your money is made during the purchase. Use this terrific calculator to make sure you fully understand your investment on the way in. Download now with the link below.

http://mandrellco.com/dealanalyzer

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What’s Up With Woburn Real Estate? Check Out These #’s

Are you a current or aspiring landlord in Massachusetts? No matter how many years you have in the rental business, fully understanding your local market is one the most important thing you can do to ensure your long-term success.  Receiving regular market updates will help you determine when’s it time to buy and when it’s time to sell. It will also allow you to see what your apartments rent for in comparison to your neighbors. Should you be increasing rents?

Here are Woburn’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics over the last 6 months of 2016.  

Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 9

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 2,594.00   

Average Listing Price: $521,735   

Average DOM (Days on Market): 37.87 Days 

Average Sales Price: $515,880

Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $1,238

Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $1,879

Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $2,274

Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $2,422

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!  

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

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How To Think Like An Investor When Purchasing Your Home

How To Think Like An Investor When Purchasing Your Home

Friends and family come to me all the time asking my advice on how to make sure they are making a good investment when they buy a new home. Some home buyers inadvertently luck out, buy in an area that happens to explode within a few years of their moving there, make a few improvements, and sell their home for twice what they bought it for just a few years prior. This is wonderful when it happens, but it is largely due to luck and timing. Other buyers get the short end of the stick and find that their home has not gained any significant value in the last 4 years and they are hardly going to break even after closing costs.

Many people don’t realize that buying a single family home to occupy is not likely to be an investment per se, meaning you are not likely to actually make much money on it, unless you are smart about it. You can’t control the market, but you can try to avoid making a bad purchase by following a few simple guidelines.

1) Plan to live in it for more than 6 years. If you are not sure you are going to stay long term, it might not make financial sense to buy unless you are doing so simply because you want to have your own place where you are the boss and might have a better quality of life than in a rental property. However, you shouldn’t count on making any money when you sell. Depending on appreciation in your area, your home might not gain value fast enough to make up for the large chunk of money you will spend on closing costs when you sell. Plus you will be spending money on maintenance and up-keep while you are living there—if you don’t, you can certainly expect your home to lose value due to wear and tear. Depreciation is just as real a factor as appreciation.

2) Never buy a $500k home in a town with a median home value of $200k. If you want your home to sell quickly and for a good price, buy at or below the median value for your area. There is nothing more frustrating than trying to sell a home that is too expensive for the average homebuyer. If most buyers in your neighborhood are looking for a 3 bed 2 bath home in the $200k range and yours is a 5 bed 3 bath home for twice as much as the typical buyer in your town can afford, it is probably going to take longer to sell. When you get farther out of the big cities, real estate markets are not so fast and furious and salability becomes a real concern.

3) It is always better to buy the worst house on the best block, than vice versa. As the old adage goes “location, location, location”: if you want your home to gain value and sell quickly for a good price when you move, buy somewhere everyone wants to be. Even if I am a hundred miles away and have never been to any of the towns my friends are considering moving to, I can pull some data on crime rates, appreciation rates, median home costs, school ratings, types of architecture and how educated the population is within a couple minutes and tell you which town is a better bet in terms of resale value.

4.) Finally, buy a house in which value can be added. If a house is perfect already, someone else is making money on you. If you want to think like an investor, buy a house in need of cosmetic updates, or a foreclosure. Plan to do some projects, and while you might have a few more headaches than the buyer of the move-in ready home, you will be glad you did when you make money on the other end.

Happy House Hunting!

 – Liz Newcombe, Sales & Leasing Consultant | Liz@MandrellCo.com

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Let’s talk about converting your multifamily into condos. What does it entail, who are the people you need to speak to, what are the things that you need to consider? I have a lot of clients that often come to me and say, “I have a two-family, I have a three-family, I have a four-family and there are some condos selling in my neighborhood, and I’m considering instead of selling my multifamily as a multifamily, what do you think about converting this building into condos and selling them off individually as condos? A couple things. I’m going to go over five things that you want to consider, five people that you want to speak to and get their advice before you make that final decision.

Number one, the number one person you want to speak to is your local real estate agent, a real estate agent that is versed in the multifamily, in condo sales within your market, within your neighborhood. What you’re trying to find out from that real estate agent is two things. One, “What would my multifamily building sell for if it sold as a whole, as a multifamily building?” The second number is, “If I break this into two units, or three units, what are those individual condos going to sell for?” That seems pretty elementary, pretty straight forward. Of course you want to know that. In addition to that what are the things that need to be done to these condos? What are the quality of the finishes within these condos that are required for the sale?

Again, if I’m renting … Right now if I live in unit one and I’m renting units two and units three, and I have laminate flooring and formica countertops and Home Depot cabinets, is that okay for this neighborhood? Is it a requirement for me to upgrade now to granite, to hardwood flooring, to stainless steel if I’m going to convert these into condos? What is the quality of the finishes needed for me to actually put a finished product on the market and actually have them sell?

Once you get those two comparisons. Let’s throw some numbers out there and let’s say we’re in a Cambridge market, let’s say it’s a three-family unit, and I can sell my multifamily for, let’s say, a million bucks. I’m looking at the condos in the same neighborhood and the condos are selling for let’s say six hundred apiece. This a pretty good spread. You have a million bucks as a multifamily. You have almost 1.8 million dollars in sales as a condo conversion. Most people would say, “Pretty straight forward.”

There’s a couple other considerations that you have, though. Next what I would do is I would talk to my general contractor. There’s a couple different ways … I’m going to give you the five people that you should speak to. The real estate agent I would say is always first and then you can toggle through the next four. I would probably bring in my general contractor next and say, “I’ve spoken to my real estate agent and I’m considering going the condo route. Here are the things that I want to do. Based on what my real estate agent is telling me, I need to probably gut this kitchen and we’re gonna go new flooring, new hardwood. We’re gonna bring in stainless appliances. I want new plumbing. I’m probably gonna change out a couple furnaces in the basement. I’m gonna separate these into different utilities for each unit.

Based on those things, what is that full renovation budget gonna run me?” Have your contractor come in, give them the specs, and then have them give you a proposal, a contracting proposal so you know exactly what you’re getting yourself into. The reason you want to do that is because, again, there’s an $800,000 spread between selling it as a multifamily and selling it as condos, but if you come in and your contractor says it’s gonna cost you about a half a million dollars to convert these into condos, is there still an 800. Now there’s only a $300,000 spread.

The other things you want to consider, $300,000 spread still a lot of money but, again, there are realtor fees, there are three realtor fees because you’ll be selling three condos. There are attorney fees. There would be three attorney fees because you’re selling three condos. There is also a bit of a home warranty, and you as a developer, or you selling these condos also have to make some type of guarantees. It’s not guarantees but some type of warranty to the end buyers. If the utilities break down, if the furnaces break down, those end condo buyers are going to be looking back to you. There are a lot of considerations there.

The next person I would speak to is an architect. The reason you would want to speak to an architect is because when you are going from a multifamily to a condo, in your condo docs you are going to need floor plans and the floor plans are going to lay out specifically which units own how much square footage, and then typically their condo fees are based on the square footage, and their ownership. Everything is kind of laid out in the condo docs and the architect is going to be the person that is going to come in and make sure that all the details of this building are specifically laid out, and then transfer all that to the attorney, which is the next person you would probably want to speak to. The attorney is going to talk to you a little bit about the process of drafting up condo docs, splitting your units into three separate entities, or three separate deeds.

There’s a lot of legals that go into taking one deed, one multifamily, and now dividing it up into three separate living quarters. The attorney is the next person you would want to speak to. You want to make sure that you are on board and fully understanding everything that legally needs to be done to convert these into condos, get your new condo docs, and everything else that goes along with it.

The last person you want to speak to, very important, as well, is your CPA, whoever does your taxes. You really want to make sure that they are versed in the real estate world. You want to make sure that they fully understand capital gains tax. What are my tax consequences for selling this building. Are they any different from selling it … your cost basis is going to be adjusted. Your cost basis is going to be adjusted from depending on how much money you put in, what your renovation budget is. Your renovation budget is going to affect your cost basis. You really want to ask them a lot of questions, your CPA a lot of question about the tax consequences that come with selling property and then your opportunity to sell these three or four condos, two, three condos, as well.

Again, talk to your real estate agent. Ask a lot of questions. Does it make financial sense? Talk to your attorney. What are the legal ramifications? Talk to your CPA. What are the tax ramifications? Talk to your general contractor. What is this going to cost me to get this to a market-ready condo? Last, but not least, talk to your architect about getting your floor plans ready so you can actually present them to your attorney to be included in the condo docs and, again, your realtor would probably want to see those floor plans, as well, because they would actually help the sale of the potential building, as well.

Again, Willie Mandrell, Mandrell Company. Five people that you want to speak to before you consider, or while you’re considering, changing your multifamily into a condo. If I can be of any help, please reach out. Mandrellco.com, m-a-n-d-r-e-l-l-c-o.com, or you can reach us at 617-297-8641. Thanks and have a nice day.

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Do You Know What A Multi-family In Quincy Sells For? Check Out The #’s!

Quincy Multifamily Sales & Rental Market Report
Are you a current or aspiring landlord in Massachusetts? No matter how many years you have in the rental business, fully understanding your local market is one the most important thing you can do to ensure your long-term success. Receiving regular market updates will help you determine when’s it time to buy and when it’s time to sell. It will also allow you to see what your apartments rent for in comparison to your neighbors. Should you be increasing rents? Is now a good time to sell?

Here is Quincy’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics for the last 6 months.
Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 80
Average Living Area by Square Feet: 2,523.00
Average Listing Price: $642,735 (What seller asked for the property)
Average DOM (Days on Market): 45.11 Days (How long it took to sell)
Average Sales Price: $632,778 (What buyers actually paid for the home)
Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $1,445
Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $1,772
Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $2,133
Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $2,533

I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!
Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

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Over the years we have seen the real estate market in Boston increase steadily. The Hyde Park Multi-Family market has experienced a $100,000 value increase in the last 2 years. Multi-families were sold for an average price of $417,000 in 2014, today, they are sold for upwards of $523,000.  Multifamily homeowners must be ecstatic with this because they are recouping some equity and making a huge profit.

Multi Families 2014 2015 2016 (January to July)
# Sales 31 46 28
Average Sales Price $417,710 $450,087 $522,978
Days on Market (DOM) 58 84 79

Condominium values have risen slightly from last year but Hyde park is more of a family oriented neighborhood so we suspect single families and multifamilies are a more stable purchase in this area. 

Condominiums 2014 2015 2016 (January to July)
# Sales 29 29 16
Average Sales Price $244,712 $232,617 $240,573
Days on Market (DOM) 56 46 77

Single family sales are on track to surpass previous years with value steadily increasing. Families looking for a great neighborhood should consider Hyde Park as you still get some land and a decent sized home.

Single Families 2014 2015 2016 (January to July)
# Sales 99 116 55
Average Sales Price $353,837 $385,299 $392,760
Days on Market (DOM) 64 62 58

For more information on the Hyde Park market, contact your Hyde Park Real Estate Specialist Denisha McDonald

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Secrets to Paying Off Your Mortgage Ahead of Time

 While the American dream may be to own a home, my dream is to own a home FREE and CLEAR. Although a process and a long term goal, the benefits far outweigh the disadvantages of paying off your mortgage early. Even if you are not making $100,000/yr, any additional money you put toward your principal helps you in the long run. You may not see it initially but trust me… it matters over the life of the loan. 

Did you know that less than 20 percent of U.S. homeowners have paid down 50 percent or more of their mortgage?   This does not have to be your statistic. By making a few simple changes you will soon be on the road to becoming mortgage-free!

Set Attainable Goals

Decide how fast you want to pay off your mortgage. How soon can you afford to pay it off? Knowing how soon you want to pay it off will allow you to figure out how much money to add to your monthly payment to accomplish that goal. Knowing the additional money needed helps you figure out what expenses you can cut from your life.

Create a Budget

We all  know that we need a goal, a plan and deadlines to succeed. I do not know of a successful person who just goes through life “doing.” There is usually always a goal and a list of items/plan to complete in order to accomplish the goal. Once you set the goal of paying off your mortgage in “x” years, we need need to create a budget to achieve the goal. Figure out your monthly income and your monthly expenses.  See where you can free up money by reallocating some things. Then, figure out how much more you can add to your monthly mortgage payment. Be sure to write that the extra goes toward your principle or else they will put it toward your interest which defeats the purpose. 

Cut the Fat

We all hate when we have to live on the bare necessities but in order to build wealth and pay down your mortgage, sacrifices need to be made. I would much rather make the sacrifice today in not having my daily coffee or show subscription in exchange for paying off my mortgage early. Let’s say I am able to pay off my mortgage in 15 years if I live “broke” on purpose. That means, in 15 years I could buy all the shoes I want with the extra money I’m saving by not having a mortgage. Sacrifice $200-$1000/mo now  to essentially earn an extra $2000 for life later?… I’ll take that ALL DAY!

Large Payments

Tax season comes every year without fail. Most of us anticipate a refund check. Most of us also have that money “spent” before we receive it for things such as vacation, new TV, Car down payment… Invest in your future and use that lump sum toward your principle. You will be happy you did sooner than you think. We are a society of immediate gratification, we need to think long term if we ever have a chance at building wealth. 

Refinance

Refinancing gives you the ability to obtain a better interest rate. Even if you have the same interest rate… you could potentially lower your monthly payments by virtue of the fact that you are now redistributing your loan repayment period to 30 years. For example, you purchased at at $200,000 and your mortgage was $1,500. Now you owe $150,000 with a refinance, your payment decreases to $1,100. All you did was refinance. Since you were able to afford $1,500 initially, now you should pay $1,100 with an additional $400 toward your principal. Couple that with any extra money you were able to save due to cutbacks…. your mortgage will be repaid in no time. 

Want more tips on how to pay off your mortgage? Send us a message to be connected to loan officers who can advise on your options. 

Contact Us

 

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Avoid These Financial Sins When Applying For a Mortgage

If you are planning to buy a home soon, make sure that you are aware of all the factors that can affect your ability to qualify for a mortgage approval. Many people think it is as easy as walking into a bank and saying ” I want to buy a home.” Banks are in the business of lending and making money… they need to ensure you are financially responsible and able to repay possibly the most money you have borrowed to date. To allow for a higher probability for an approval and the best terms, follow these 10 home buying commandments.

Thou shalt not change jobs, become self-employed, or quit your job.

Changing jobs resets the clock. You need 2 years of full time employment or employment within the same field to be a god candidate for a mortgage. Any sudden changes raises a red flag. 

Thou shalt not buy a car, truck, or van.

Do not incur any additional debt when you plan to purchase a home. This not only affects your debt-to-income ratio, it also affects your credit score. You essentially just borrowed against your home loan. BAD IDEA

Thou shalt not use credit cards excessively.

I think this is a no brainer but again, do not incur any additonal debt. It shows that you are not responsible financially.

Thou shalt not miss payments.

Your credit score is made up of history of payments. If you show lenders you cannot repay your current debt… do you think they are more or less likely to approve you to take on more debt?

Thou shalt not spend money you have set aside for down payment and closing costs.

Purchasing a home is expensive, let’s be honest. Do not spend ANY money until you have keys to yout new place. There are usually surprise costs so be prepared. 

Thou shalt not buy furniture.

Again, NO SHOPPING until you are the legal owner of the property.

Thou shalt not originate any inquires into your credit.

Do not apply for any other credit, loans etc until AFTER you own your home. Inquiries raise red flags.

Thou shalt not make large deposits without checking with your loan officer.

EVERY DOLLAR needs to be accounted for. Do not make deposits or large withdrawals from your account without checking with your loan officer. They can advise on what to do, how to “source” your money etc. This goes back to money laundering, they need to ensure it is your money and not someone using you to “clean” their money.

Thou shalt not change bank accounts.

DO NOT CHANGE ANYTHING that affects your finances in any way until you take ownership of the home. 

Thou shalt not co-sign a loan for anyone.

DO NOT and i repeat DO NOT co-sign for anyone for anything. I have 2 kids and I already let them know… I will not be co-signing for student loans, car loans, nothing. If they laps on payment, it affects your credit score. Their debt also becomes your debt and impacts your debt-to-income ratio.

 

I hope these commandments help you as you start thinking of purchasing a home. Check back on our site for more information on how to make yourself the best candidate for a mortgage approval. 

Email us your questions and we will create a blog post on them to assist others searching for the same information. CONTACT@MANDRELLCO.COM

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Assessed Vs Appraised Vs Market Value| Which Do I Use?

How do we determine Value?
Many of our clients question how the value of their home was ascertained. They see various price quotes on Zillow, Public records, assessors office. All of these values are accurate but they serve very different purposes. It is important to understand what each number represents.

Assessed Value: Value determined by local municipality for tax purposes only. You pay property taxes based on this value. It has nothing to do with the resale value of your home. 

Appraised Value: An Appraiser is hired to determine value that banks are willing to lend on. Essentially, they want to find similar homes in the area that have sold and how much they sold for. They then compare your home to this home and assess whether your home is worth more or less. 

Market Value: What a buyer is willing to pay for the property. It is a combination of Appraised value, inventory, and demand. We understand that if there are several homes on the market listed around $500,000 but none of them are going under contract… these homes are more than a buyer is willing to pay. However, if homes at this price are going under contract within days/weeks, we know that buyers are willing to pay within this price for homes in the area. 

Determining the value of a home for Sale is a little more in depth than simply reviewing comparable homes. 

If you are interested in finding out the value of your home, please call today to schedule your FREE home value analysis! 

617-297-8641 or email us at contact@mandrellco.com

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With mortgage rates remaining near historic lows, many financial experts are making the case that student-loan debt doesn’t have to hold back millennials from buying a home. But the message isn’t getting across: Nearly 70 percent of millennials say they are delaying a real estate purchase because of their student debt load, according to a new survey by CommonBond.

Forbes.com recently highlighted whether a person with student-loan debt was ready to become a home owner with the following assessment:

  • Debt-to-income ratio isn’t everything. Yes, the proportion of your income that goes toward paying your debt is a central determinant of whether you’re ready to buy a home. Most lenders require a debt-to-income ratio of 36 percent or less to qualify for a mortgage. But a buyer with student-loan debt shouldn’t worry that their number will automatically disqualify them. The key is that they pay their bills on time and still have enough income left over to compensate for their debt.
  • You can still handle more debt. Life is all about balance. Take a serious look at your monthly budget/income. You either need to have a large enough cushion (20% down payment) or calculate what your monthly expenses would be to own a home. If the cost of owning is around the same as renting (all included), then you should be adjusting and preparing to purchase. The best interest rates tend to go to those who can offer a 20 percent down payment, but loans are available that require as little as 3 percent down on a home.
  • Make a budget. To save for the down payment, would-be buyers need a budget in place. Katie Brewer, a certified financial planner in Dallas, suggests budgeting with broad buckets: fixed expenses, variable expenses, and longer-term goals (e.g. paying down debt, buying a home, or saving for retirement). Brewer recommends keeping fixed expenses to 50 percent or less of your overall budget. There’s no one budget style that is more effective, however. The important part is to just pick a method and then start working toward the goal — saving for a down payment, in this case. With the Boston rental market being as aggressive as it is… It may be a great idea to downsize for a bit so you can save. Get Roommates, Eat out less, Decrease leisure spending. You have to tweak your “budget” to what makes logical and financial sense to you. I am a firm believer in those who want something bad enough…will do everything in their power to make it happen. The question then becomes: HOW BAD DO YOU WANT IT?

If You would like more strategies on saving up for a home or would like to speak with one of our trusted mortgage lenders for more strategies on preparing for home ownership, please email us at Buy@MandrellCo.com.

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Recently I was finally able to go to my first Boston Wealth Builders event, “Building Wealth Through Multifamily Investing” and it was everything I hoped it would be. A big thing for me when deciding to go to any real estate meetup is to not have to sit there and listen to a bunch of sales pitches from whatever guest speaker they decide to have attend that day. Instead, this is event was purely educational, covering topics such as evaluating your target market, determining property values, calculating cash flow, etc. As a beginner investor it was great to be educated on so many different topics involving multifamily real estate investing.

Another aspect of the event that I really enjoyed and thought was powerful was the several guests that attended to also speak. There was a mortgage broker from Sierra Pacific Mortgage, an attorney from Mahoney Law Group and a real estate agent from The Mandrell Company. No, they were not there to sell, but to cover their own topics as well as reinforce the organizer’s presentation.  The mortgage broker went into great detail about all the different loan options that are available to people, along with several that some people may not be aware of. Also, he explained some of the qualifications that his company goes by that may present an easier option to obtaining a loan that could help you fund your deal. The attorney provided a handout which essentially documented a step by step walkthrough of what you need to be doing throughout the process of purchasing a multifamily property which was incredibly helpful. Lastly, the real estate agent supplied a ton of additional information as well as his own personal experience of what he is noticing in these current markets and where some of the best places might be to look for multifamily properties.

At the end of the event they had allowed plenty of time for questions to be answered and even let people talk individually with any of the speakers that were there. This was a great opportunity to start networking with the type of people that you need to establish relationships if you want to be successful in this business. Ultimately this was the biggest take away from that day’s event. The importance of networking cannot be stressed enough and to be a part of a group that prides itself on creating an environment in which you can connect and build relationships with like minded people is something that I definitely look forward to continuing.

 

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Boston real estate is determined by supply and demand. There is a high demand for housing in our city due to our world renowned universities and hospitals. As long as there is a high demand for housing and the supply is limited… prices will continue to rise. We have a finite amount of land so developers are forced to be creative and build upwards or convert multi-families into individual condominiums.

Interest rates are relatively low so there are more buyers on the market so the competition is heavy

Price increases when you have multiple people applying for the same property. If you want an apartment or a house, you will increase your offer price to ensure you beat the competition.

 

In short, prices will continue to rise until supply meets demands.

For more information on the Boston Market or to connect with one of our agents please call 617-297-8641 or email us at contact@Mandrellco.com

 

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A lot of my friends comb through craigslist for apartments that do not have realtor fees. I completely understand as I used it as my primary search engine a few years ago as well. The problem with craigslist is that there are few checks and balances which therefore leads to rental scams posted. A new report from New York University explores just how common these scams are. Spoiler alert: they are everywhere.

How the Scam Works:

You are looking for a new place to live on the very popular Craigslist apartment listings. You know that scams are common on the site, but just how prevalent are they? Very! Craigslist fails to identify more than half of rental scam listings, and suspicious posts linger for as long as 20 hours before being taken down.

Researchers reviewed more than 2 million for-rent posts and found 29,000 fake listings in 20 major cities. Yes, Boston was on the list for researchers and I have discovered a few myself within 10minutes on the site. Of those, there were three key types of scams. In the first, a fake post instructs a would-be tenant to purchase a credit report. The scammer gets a commission from the credit reporting site, even though there is no property for rent.

In another scheme, con artists duplicate rental listings from other sites and post on Craigslist at a lower price. Prospective renters pay a deposit via wire transfer. Another pervasive scam is “realtor service” companies. Targets are asked to pay fees to access listings of pre-foreclosure rentals or rent-to-own properties. In the majority of cases, the companies leading the scams have no connection to the properties listed. Realtors do not ask for fees up front nor should you pay, especially when the information is public knowledge. There is NO SECRET PRE-FORECLOSURE LIST… ITS PUBLIC INFORMATION! You find them in your newspaper, local search engines, Zillow, RealtyTrac, your city’s public records database. If someone is asking for money before they prove themselves… RUN!

How to Spot a Rental Scam:

Don’t wire money or use a prepaid debit card: You should never pay a security deposit or first month’s rent by prepaid debit card or wire transfer. These payments are the same as sending cash – once you send it, you have no way to get it back. Real Estate professionals ask for checks which are held in escrow and you receive a deposit receipt. Realtors are held to a code of Ethics and you know who they are, you can track them, report them, not so with online tricksters.

Watch out for deals that sound too good: Scammers lure in targets by promising low rents, great amenities and other perks. If the price seems much better than offered elsewhere, it may be a scam. Many people search for rent-to-own opportunities… while these do exist, they are usually MORE EXPENSIVE than market rent and not thousands cheaper. You will never find a 3 bedroom for rent at $900 in Boston. We all know that is unrealistic..why would you fall for that scam on craigslist? Even if it was rent-to-own…where is their profit? Think like a business and you won’t get got!

See the property in person: Don’t send money to someone you’ve never met for an apartment you haven’t seen. If you can’t visit an apartment or house yourself, ask someone you trust to go and confirm that it is what was advertised. Call their bluff… You will show up with check in hand if you like the property…scammers generally never have access to the property so they will find an excuse as to why they can’t get you in on a specific date or ever.

Search for the same ad in other cities: Search for the listing online. If you find the same ad listed in other cities, that’s a huge red flag.

 

The moral of the story is…. feel free to use craigslist for finding apartments and homes but understand there are ALOT of scammers out there. Do your due diligence (research) before handing over your hard earned cash. Sometimes paying a realtor fee is worth it not to have the stress or risk losing your money. For assistance in finding an apartment in the greater boston area…be sure to connect with one of our agents

Source: PR Newswire
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Roslindale Real Estate Is on FIRE! Here’s What’s Selling…

Are you in the market to buy, rent or sell property in Roslindale? Before you make a move, understanding the local market condition can make all the difference. We’ve outlined below exactly what’s happening with Single Family, Multifamily, and condos in the area. All these number reflect what’s taken place over the last 6 months. 

Single Family Listings

Total Homes SOLD: 72

Average Living Area by Square Feet:   1,897.04

Average Listing Price:    $488,750

Average DOM (Days on Market): 40.15                                 

Average Sales Price:  $491,923   

Condominium Listings

Total Condos SOLD: 97

Average Living Area by Square Feet:   1,196.04

Average Listing Price:    $372,240

Average DOM (Days on Market): 25.15                                 

Average Sales Price:  $374,938

Multifamily Listings

Total Multifamily Buildings SOLD: 26

Average Living Area by Square Feet:   2,808.04

Average Listing Price:    $583,240

Average DOM (Days on Market): 65.15                                 

Average Sales Price:  $588,327  

Would you like to get your own FREE Sales and Rental Market Report catered to your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report.  We can provide you similar data for any town or city in the commonwealth.

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641,  for custom reports or questions about the data provided.

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Are you in the market to buy, rent or sell property in Hyde Park? Before you make a move, understanding the local market can make all the difference. We’ve outlined below exactly what’s happened in the multi-family in Hyde Park over the last 6 months. Take a look at the numbers and see where you fit in.

 Multifamily Family Post

Total Homes SOLD: 26

Average Living Area by Square Feet:   2,590.04

Average Listing Price:    $467,208

Average DOM (Days on Market): 80.15                                 

Average Sales Price:  $460,923   

 

Would you like to get your own FREE Sales and Rental Market Report catered to your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report.  We can provide you similar data for any town or city in the commonwealth.

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641,  for custom reports or questions about the data provided.

 

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Credit affects all major financial decisions that involve someone lending you money/credit. It should be no surprise that your credit score will also affect your mortgage rate. Your credit scores affect the kinds of mortgages you can be approved for, how much you can borrow, the mortgage rates you’ll pay and even how much you’ll pay for private mortgage insurance (PMI). It’s not impossible to buy a home with damaged credit; it’s just much more expensive.
Credit scores are instrumental in applying and being approved for a mortgage. When it comes to FHA financing at least, you will be required to have a credit score of at least 580 in order to be eligible for a loan. The higher your credit score is beyond that, the better the terms will be. With a 580 credit score you also qualify for the low 3.5% down. If your credit score is below 580, you can still qualify for an FHA loan but you will need a 10% down payment. The drawback to a 580 is that your interest rate will not be at the national average, it will most likely be slightly higher. Consult your mortgage lender for more information. (We work with several lenders who work hard to get you the best rate, to be connected to one of them, please click here)
This is why it’s so important to understand your credit score in the months before you apply for a mortgage. If you do have impaired credit history, you’ll want to work to improve your credit scores before you even apply. And if you already have good credit, you’ll want to keep it as high as possible by avoiding taking on other new debt.
We host seminars throughout the year regarding improving credit and have affiliations with credit repair companies.
For more information, feel free to contact us.

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Want to know what your Cambridge home is worth?

Are you in the market to buy, rent or sell property in Cambridge?  Before you make a move, understanding the local market can make all the difference. We’ve outlined below exactly what’s happened in the multi family of Cambridge over the last 6 months. Take a look at the numbers and see where you fit in.

Condos & Multifamily Family Post

Total Homes SOLD: 56

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 3,187.96

Average Listing Price: $1,305,354

Average DOM (Days on Market): 34.25

Average Sales Price: $1,324,373

Closing –

Would you like to get your own FREE Sales and Rental Market Report catered to your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report.  We can provide you similar data for any town or city in the commonwealth.

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions about the data provided.

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Are you in the market to buy, rent or sell property in Quincy?  Before you make a move, understanding the local market can make all the difference. We’ve outlined below exactly what’s happened in the condos of Quincy over the last 6 months. Take a look at the numbers and see where you fit in.

Condos Post

Total Homes SOLD: 145

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 1,091.35

Average Listing Price:     $291,886                                         

Average DOM (Days on Market):   58.96

Average Sales Price: : $288,768   

Would you like to get your own FREE Sales and Rental Market Report catered to your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report.  We can provide you similar data for any town or city in the commonwealth.

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions about the data provided.

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How Do I Make More Money Selling Real Estate?

Make More $$ Selling Investment Properties! Sales Agents Wanted (All of Mass & RI)

Local Boston Real Estate Office Looking for New & Experienced Agents! Starting with 70% commission splits for experienced agents & 65% for newly licensed agents!

Our office is unique in that we focus on Multifamily & Investment Real Estate Sales. Real estate investors are “repeat” buyer and sellers and building long-term relationships with local investors is our top priority. Right now we are busy and looking for new agents. Our office is in Boston but we’re in need of agents North, South, & West of the city as well as RI.

You can read more about The Mandrell Company by visiting http://www.MandrellCo.com

You can also learn more about building a sales business by working with investors at http://www.SellMoreBostonRealEstate.com

We employ a virtual sales model. No floor time required. Most of our agents work from home or out of their private office spaces.

We do an extensive amount of marketing and will provide leads but will also train agents on how to build your own business connections. Part time or Full time.

Send resume to contact@mandrellco.com to schedule an interview.

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Are you in the market to buy, rent or sell property in South Boston?  Before you make a move, understanding the local market can make all the difference. We’ve outlined below exactly what’s happened in the condos of South Boston over the last 6 months. Take a look at the numbers and see where you fit in.

Condos & Multifamily Family Post

Total Homes SOLD: 370

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 1,149.28

Average Listing Price: $611,837

Average DOM (Days on Market): 44.65

Average Sales Price: : $615,976 

Would you like to get your own FREE Sales and Rental Market Report catered to your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report.  We can provide you similar data for any town or city in the commonwealth.

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions about the data provided.

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Are you in the market to buy, rent or sell property in Dorchester? Before you make a move, understanding the local market can make all the difference. We’ve outlined below exactly what’s happened in the Condos of Dorchester over the last 6 months. Take a look at the numbers and see where you fit in.

Total Homes SOLD: 223

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 1,165

Average Listing Price: $378,863

Average DOM (Days on Market): 45

Average Sales Price: $382,174

Would you like to get your own FREE Sales and Rental Market Report catered to your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report.  We can provide you similar data for any town or city in the commonwealth.

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions about the data provided.

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