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4 Task You Must Complete to Maximize Your Property Sales Price


 

Hi All, I Just want to go over briefly four things that you can do when you’re selling your multi-family. Your two, your three, your four unit, your residential multi-family property. Four things that you can do to make sure that you maximize the price. That you get the most. When putting that property on the market, you walk away with the most money that you possibly can as a potential seller.

Four things that you can potentially do. Let’s start with number one. You can provide a unit vacant. Why would it be beneficial to you as a seller to provide a unit vacant when selling your multi-family? You have two potential buyers when you’re selling, let’s say a three family property. You have the owner-occupant buyer. Someone who’s going to purchase the property, move into the property, move into one of the units and rent out the other two to supplement their income. Then you have the investor. An owner-occupant buyer is almost always going to pay more for the property, their primary residence, the place that they’re going to live, than a potential investor.

Investor’s going to come in and they’re going to analyze the numbers specifically and strictly and say, “Does this property make sense from a financial standpoint and if it does or it doesn’t, I’m going to make my decision based on that.” An owner-occupant buyer is going to move in and make it their own. It’s the place that they live. There’s an emotional attachment to that place. By you providing a unit vacant, you’re essentially allowing them to move in. Without a unit vacant, essentially if all three units are occupied, only an investor can buy that property from you. Basically you’re eliminating the owner-occupant opportunity if all three units are tenant occupied and there’s not a space for an owner-occupant.

The first thing I would say is I wouldn’t go out and necessarily kick a tenant out, but if there’s a tenant moving out and you’re considering selling somewhere around that same time, you know you have a lease expiring in three or four months, it may be a good time to say let’s put the property on the market while I have this potential vacancy and move in at that time.

Number two. Make obvious repairs. If there are some things that need to be done, you are going to maximize your selling price by making sure that the property is shown in it’s best light. That seems obvious to some people but many people don’t do it prior to selling. Making sure that any appliances that are broken, light fixtures, front door, back door, the front porch, back decks, making sure that those things that are quite obvious as soon as you walk up to the building or as soon as you walk inside a unit, this is clearly not the way it should be. Making sure that those things are done prior to putting your house on the market or prior to putting that property on the market is going to maximize your sale.

Prepare for a spring or summer sale. If you are, let’s say it’s January, 2017 and you are moving into, considering selling, you have about three or four months before that spring market hits, that April, May, you really want to preparing your property for that spring marker or that summer market coming up. The reason you want to ideally sell in the spring or the summer, you have a larger pool of buyers at that particular time. Investors are going to be around all year round. But your owner-occupant buyers, if they’re renting an apartment right now and considering buying, their leases typically end sometime during the summer months. You’re going to have a much larger pool of buyers. People typically like to move during the summer when things are easier and not moving in the snow, especially in a place like New England. Preparing yourself mentally, getting your documentation ready, letting your tenants know about the sale, and making sure that you’re getting those things done during the winter months so when the spring and summer rolls around that your house or your property is prepared for that sale.

Last but not least, overpricing your property. Don’t overprice your property. Price it, I would say accordingly. Talk to your realtor, pull comparable sales, what’s going on in the neighborhood, what makes sense for this particular property compared to other sales. When you overprice the property, what you’ll end up with is potentially a stale listing. A stale listing is something that’s been sitting out there for 60, 90 days and now it’s not getting as much attention as it should be. When you do that you actually tend to get a lower sales price then you would have if you just priced the property appropriately from the beginning and sold it as quickly as possible to the best buyers during this spring or summer market.

Again, providing a unit vacant you’re going to get more money from an owner-occupant than you are from a potential investor. Making the obvious repairs. Making sure that your property is presentable and showing in the best light. Preparing for that spring or summer sale and not overpricing your property. Making sure that your property comes on the market at a reasonable and fair price compared to other similar properties that are selling on the market. If you do these four things, you’ll be sure that your sales price is maximized and you’ll get the most money and put the most money in your pocket after the property is sold.

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4 Documents You Must Have During A Successful Home Sale

I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

I want to talk to you today a little bit about documentation, preparing to sell your multifamily property, any property in between two and 20 units. Typically, we’re talking about two and four units, residential property, but this also applies to larger investment properties as well. Documentation, getting ready to sell. What are you thinking about? What are the documents that you need to gather? I’m giving you right here is four sets of documents that your potential buyers are going to want to ask you about, your realtor is going to ask you about, so you might as well go ahead and get these documents prepared as early as possible.

The first set of documents that you want are your tenant leases and the rent roll. You don’t necessarily have to provide the actual physical copy of your leases to your potential buyers, but what they’re going to want to know is when did those leases start, when do those leases expire, and then the second half of that is what each tenant is paying. That’s a big part of selling a multifamily. It’s a big factor when potential buyers are buying multifamily, are am I going to be able to move into a unit? If one of the tenants are below-market rent, when does that lease expire and when am I now able to increase the rent. Making sure that you’re collecting that information, understanding when are your leases expiring and what each tenant is paying and being able to provide that information to your realtor, so your realtor can provide that to potential buyers.

The second set of items that you’re going to want to collect are systems warranties. Did you recently have the roof changed? Did you recently install a new heating system or a new AC system? Appliances, did you recently install appliances into any of the units within the buildings and are they still within warranty? That is adding value. If you are able to take those warranties and provide those to the new potential buyer and show this refrigerator was installed last year and it’s still under warranty, that is a great way to provide value, so you really want to go out and see if you can collect any warranties that you have from roof to heating systems to appliances, anything else. Systems maintenance. When was the last time that your heating system was serviced? If you have a good maintenance schedule in place, you should have been documenting that over the years and being able to turn that over to a potential buyer is going to create value and give the buyer a sense of ease knowing that the systems were maintained over the years. That is something else that you should be looking for in preparation for selling your multifamily house.

Last but not least, we live in Massachusetts and then throughout the country, 1978 lead paint law. Lead paint is no longer used after the year 1978, but within Boston and a lot of the areas surrounding us, these homes were built 1910, 1920s, so a lot of them still do contain lead paint. If you have lead paint documentation, if your apartments have been lead paint certified, this, again, creates a lot of value, creates a lot of comfort with your potential buyers and if you can provide that documentation right up front to show them that that’s not something that they don’t have to worry about any longer, they can now move children under the age of six in and not have to worry about the lead paint hazard. That is going to create a lot of value for you. It’s going to help you potentially get a quicker sale and for a higher sales price in making sure that you are also collecting that lead paint documentation as well. Four things, tenant lease and rent rolls, warranties, maintenance schedules, and then a lead paint documentation. If you provide those four sets of items, you should be in really good shape to get your property sold.

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In our latest series of educational webinars, we explored the topic of self managing your rental properties vs. hiring a property manager. In the fourth and final section of the webinar, we talk about six ways to create more value in Boston rentals, creating a “preventative maintenance schedule” and should you hire a professional and what do they charge.

For more resources and tips on managing your properties, please contact us.

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In our latest series of educational webinars, we explored the topic of self managing your rental properties vs. hiring a property manager. In the third of four sections of the webinar, we talk about protecting your real estate investments and essential landlord/tenant forms that you will need throughout the course of running your business. Many people will say it’s not “if” you will get sued, but “when” so learning about all the strategies that can protect your investments is imperative.

For more resources and tips on managing your properties, please contact us.

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In our latest series of educational webinars, we explored the topic of self managing your rental properties vs. hiring a property manager. In the second of four sections of the webinar, we talk about how you should handle your income, expenses and taxes when it comes to your rental properties. This is another area of focus that is very important when running your business.

For more resources and tips on managing your properties, please contact us.

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In our latest series of educational webinars, we explored the topic of self managing your rental properties vs. hiring a property manager. Even if you initially plan to self manage your properties, it is important to still factor in the cost of hiring a property manager. In the first of four sections of the webinar, we talk about the eight tools every small landlord needs, mastering your rental market and marketing your rental units. Each topic is very important when running your properties like a business and making the best decisions for the business.

For more resources and tips on managing your properties, please contact us.

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Cash Flow

Cash Flow by definition is the total amount of money being transferred into and out of a business, especially as affecting liquidity. In real estate investing, what this means is:

Total Income – Total Expenses = Cash Flow

While you would assume total income would consist of just rent, make sure to include other potential sources of income including application fees, late fees and laundry income. If these sources are possible, also make sure to estimate your numbers using a conservative approach. In the long run this will be the most beneficial approach. On the flip side, your total expenses are NOT simply your mortgage, property taxes and insurance. Other expenses that cannot be overstated include utilities, potential flood insurance, repairs, vacancy, property management and capital expenditures. The last three expenses can be used as percentages against your monthly income from the property. Failure to include ALL possible expenses could lead to you purchasing a “deal” that actually turns out to be no deal at all.

Depreciation/Appreciation

Once you have purchased a property and become a landlord, it is to stay up to date with the value of your property and identify whether appreciation or depreciation has taken place. While this is very important post purchase, factoring in appreciation for an investment decision is speculative in nature and brings unneeded risk into the situation. In the event that your property has depreciated over time, there may be significant tax advantages to this and those same advantages may even be available to you if your property has appreciated over time.

Net Operating Income

Net Operating Income by definition equals all revenue from the property minus all reasonably necessary operating expenses. To look at this simply, NOI is calculated on a monthly basis using monthly income and expense data, therefore it can be converted to annual data just by multiplying by 12. The important thing to remember with NOI is that the formula does not include debt service costs, (loan costs) which differs from cash flow. One of the biggest reasons a landlord will want to know this number is because Net Operating Income plays a huge role in determining the value of your property. For this reason, it is in your best interest to work towards maximizing this number using different strategies to accomplish this.

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The last topic that we covered in our sit down with Anastasia Tacewicz from GMH Mortgage Services was some of the things you want to be considering when choosing a mortgage professional. This is a key individual throughout the home buying process so you will really want to do your due diligence when selecting someone to work with. Anastasia is a great reference as she is someone who we have worked with in the past and have had great experiences with.

Need more info about mortgages or about getting pre approved? Contact us at 617-297-8641

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Assessed Value Vs. Market Value – Do you know the difference?

When searching for properties many first time home buyers often get confused about how the value of real property is determined. It’s falsely assumed that the assessed value (on a listing sheet) is also the “market” value of that particular home. Here in the city of Boston and throughout Massachusetts that couldn’t be further from the truth.

The “assessed” value of a home is the value the local municipality places on the property for the purposes of assessing taxes. The government (simply put) looks at the size of the lot, the square footage of the home and any improvements recently done and determines the value for assessing taxes. The total tax bill given (annually) to that particular property is determined by dividing the total amount needed for the municipality by the local homes and the associated values.

The “market value” or true value of a piece of property is determined by supply and demand and a few other factors. Market value is based on what the market (or able and willing buyers) are willing to pay for that home. The market value can be higher or lower than the assessed value.

In Massachusetts the market value is often much higher than the assessed number. Taxes can be paid on an assessed value of $200,000 while the home recently sold for its market value of $300,000. Local governments typically review assessed values annually and adjust accordingly.

One last point. The “listing price” for a home is not always an indication of the property’s value. A seller’s real estate agent can list a property for any number they want. Unless they can find a buyer to pay that price, the listing price is just a seller’s wish.

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Do you have a single or multifamily property in the Boston area with problem tenants? Are your tenants not paying or just causing you headache? If so, we may have a quick solution for you.

The Mandrell Company works with a long list of local real estate investors and developers and each of them is looking for new investment property. These investors buy single family and multi-family homes of any size, any price range, any number of units, and in any condition.

Working with us and our investors we can help to sell your home quickly and easily. You don’t have to worry about spending money on repairs, putting a sign in the yard, having strangers drop in through your house,  or wondering when your property will sell.

When you sell your troubled property with our investors and developer clients:

• You get multiple cash offers and avoid most normal closing costs
• You sell directly to them and there isn’t often no Realtor commission to pay
• You sell your house in “as is” condition – no cleaning or repairs to make
• You can close quickly – if that’s what you need.

Our clients are also buying properties in foreclosure, probate, pending evictions, inherited, vacant or abandoned, or just in need of much work.

If you are interested in a quick cash offer on your property, please call our office today at 617-297-8641 or email me at Willie @ MandrellCo.com

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Live In Boston & Receive An Annual Break On Your Property Taxes!

Do you own property in the city of Boston? Do you plan to make a purchase in the near future? In either case you should know that the city offers an exemption from paying a portion of your property tax bill every year. This residential tax exemption is for those individuals who and own and live in their homes (no exemption given to landlords).  Per CityOfBoston.gov – “Taxpayers who own and occupy their home can save on their tax bill by having a portion of their tax bill exempted from taxation. To qualify for the residential exemption, homeowners must own and occupy their home on January 1 preceding the start of the fiscal year.”

In 2015 the residential tax exemption amount is $1,852. That’s a tax break of over $150 per month.

How is the exemption calculated each year? The fiscal year residential exemption is 30% of the average value of all residential property in the City. This number is recalculated by the city each year to determine the current exemption.

How can you apply? To verify eligibility, your Social Security Number is required for identification purposes. The information will be kept confidential and be used solely to confirm a personal income tax filing from your address with the Commonwealth of MA Department of Revenue. You can find more information and download an application by visiting http://www.cityofboston.gov/assessing/exemptions/resexempt.asp
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Your invited to join Boston Wealth Builders at the Quincy Marriott Hotel (September 19th, 2015) as we learn how to intelligently improve our property values. Come get a better understanding of what local appraisers are looking for when determining the values they place on property and how you can ensure your home’s appreciation. This event is free to the public but you must RSVP as seating is limited.

The residential appraisal is an integral part of the real estate transaction since appraisers are the trusted vendor for lenders in the mortgage business.  Whether you’re a real estate homeowner or an investor, understanding the appraisal process is a critical component for increasing your property value for the years ahead.  Danyl Collings, of Forsythe Appraisals, will be addressing the following items in regards to real estate appraisals:

1.)  What are the three main items appraisers are looking for when appraising real estate investment properties?  Why are they important?

2.)  What information can you provide the appraiser to expedite your appraisal process and getting the report into the lender?

3.)  Understanding your improvements to the property relative to the property’s market neighborhood and Town/City.

4.)  Why is rental income important in an investor appraisal?

Since 2009, Danyl has served as branch manager for Forsythe Appraisals, LLC – Boston Branch which provides residential appraisal services in MA, NH and RI.  In this role, he is in charge of the sales, marketing, recruiting, training and report quality and delivery for the Boston Branch.  Forsythe Appraisals, LLC is the largest private appraisal firm in the County with over 250 + appraisers throughout the United States.

To RSVP for this event, please click the link below. You’ll be asked to create a FREE account and join Boston Wealth Builders. Once you’ve become a member you can RSVP and save your seat. Hope to see you there!

http://www.BostonWealthBuilders.com

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Okay, so you’ve found great tenants and their expected to move in on the 1st of the month. Now what? Here is a quick “to do” list to make sure you and your rental property appear super professional from day one.

  1. Change the locks and get new keys to the apartment – You’ll like your tenants to feel as safe as possible when they take possession of their new living space. The last thing you want is for them to start questioning whether the old tenants still have access to the unit. Be sure to make several copies and keep a copy for yourself. You’ll need your set of keys if your tenants happen to lose theirs or if you need to enter the apartment for an emergency.
  2. Get a new mailbox key – In the haste of new tenant preparations, many landlords forget the also place a new lock and key on the mailbox. Your previous tenants should have changed their address with the post office so there is no need for them to come back and access this box.
  3. Change the name on the mailbox – Make sure to let the mailman know your old tenant have moved and the new tenants are coming in. The easiest way to do this is to place a new label with the tenants name on the mailbox. If you don’t have one already, get yourself a label maker. When your new tenants see their name on the mailbox on move in day, it will make them feel right at home.
  4. Get the apartment professionally cleaned  – Make sure the apartment has a clean/ fresh feel to it. If you want your tenants to stay for awhile they’ll need to feel as if it’s truly there home. The best way to do that is to make sure there are no remnants of your prior tenants. I always replace the toilet seat and leave the plastic wrap on top. For $20, this shows my new tenants that I truly care about making them feel comfortable.
  5. Add a fresh coat of paint on the walls – Paint is the “new car smell” for apartments.
  6. Check the batteries in the smoke detectors & change the light bulbs – There is a good chance the tenants that just moved out didn’t change the batteries or light bulbs. Do these things before your new tenant moves in. You’d rather not have a smoke detector chirping a week after move in and you certainly don’t want light bulbs dying as they’re moving in boxes.
  7. Prepare a “Welcome Basket” – Moving isn’t easy and there are often things that are lost in boxes the first couple nights after a move. Help out your new tenants out with a couple a basic items. Prepare a welcome basket with toilet paper, tooth paste, tooth brush, soap, local take-out menus and any other low cost item that they may need the first night. Anything you can do to help them get settled in is going to be very much appreciated.
  8.  Get a list of service providers for your new tenants – Prepare a list of companies your new tenants will need to contact. They’re going to call you for this information anyhow, so you might as well have it ready for them at move in. Who provides gas or oil heating? Who provides electrical services? What about cable and internet?

Do you need help finding qualified tenants for an empty apartment(s)? We can help you fill your vacancy at NO COST to you! We do a complete a background and credit check as well as income verification and several other services. For more information, call us at 617-297-8641 or email Willie@Mandrellco.com

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Drinks & Networking – Local Investor Gathering!

Come join us for drinks, appetizers and networking. This is an informal gathering for local Boston Real Estate Investors and a great opportunity to meet potential partners and mentors. The best way to push forward with your investing career is to surround yourself with people who want the same. Here’s your chance! Look forward to seeing you there!

Tuesday, February 10, 2015 – 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

Savvor Restaurant & Lounge, 180 Lincoln Street, Boston, MA

RSVP @ http://www.meetup.com/Networth-Investors/events/220073418/

Boston Home Center University – Meet The Lenders

Meet The Lenders is a one-stop shopping opportunity to meet different mortgage lenders and learn about special mortgage programs, money to close, free mortgage pre-qualification, affordable homeownership listings applications, home repair, lead paint assitance and sign up for a free homebuyer and credit course.  Come learn about your options to get you on the right path to Homeownership! FREE Event!

Saturday, February 7, 2015 – 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

Edward Brooke Charter School, 190 Cummins Hwy, Roslindale, MA

RSVP @ http://www.meetup.com/Urban-Money-Matters/events/219759172/

Building Wealth Through Home Ownership

Come learn how many build wealth through smart home ownership. Topics will include but not limited to the following:

• Why the surest path to wealth is through home ownership

• Basics of home buying and getting yourself on the path to ownership

• Home buying timeline and what to consider when searching

• The pre-approval process and mortgage loan basics

• How to manage yourself through bad times and avoid foreclosure

• Quick tips on how to repair bad credit and save for a down payment

• Loan programs and grants offered for first time buyers

• Intro to personal finance software and monitoring your financial position

Thursday, February 19, 2015 – 6:00 PM to 8:30 PM

Roxbury Community College, Academic Bldg #3 Rm 121, 1234 Columbus Avenue, Roxbury, MA

RSVP for FREE @ http://www.meetup.com/Urban-Money-Matters/events/219829343/

Dorchester Real Estate Agent

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Are you a current or aspiring landlord in Dorchester?  No matter your years in the rental business, fully understanding your local market is one the most important things you can do to ensure your long-term success. Receiving regular market updates will help you determine when’s it time to buy and when it’s time to sell.  It will also allow you to see what your units rent for in comparison to your neighbors. Should you be increasing your rents?

Here are Dorchester’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics for the last 6 months.

Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 123

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 3,517

Average Listing Price: $532,918

Average DOM (Days on Market): 58.85

Average Sales Price: $527,420

Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $1,451

Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $1,691

Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $1,823

Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $2,170

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email (or complete the contact form below) to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

 

 

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Do I need different insurance if I’m house flipping? What type of coverage do I need for vacant homes?

Make sure you are properly covered! Vacant homeowners insurance (vacant home insurance hereafter) is special insurance protection placed on a residence that is expected to be empty or unoccupied for over 60 to 90 days, or perhaps much longer. Every insurance policy offered by a property insurer is different and there are even variations from State to State, but no “regular” homeowners insurance policy is able to cover a house that is not being lived in.

In order to properly protect the home, the existing policy needs to be cancelled and a special vacant home or vacant building policy needs to be put in place. A new policy has to replace the old. The vacancy policy is not the same as the existing homeowners policy in most cases. The homeowner has to understand what the differences are, and also should expect to pay much more for a vacant homeowners policy.

Read more at http://www.articlealley.com/article_818308_33.html?ktrack=kcplink

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