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First talk a little bit about what equity is. Equity is the value that you have in your home, the difference between the market value of the property and the debt on the property. If you have $100,000 home, a home that’s worth $100,000, you owe $60,000 on that home, you have $40,000 in equity. Simplest explanation, 100,000 minus $60,000 in debt. If you sold the property today, you’d walk away with $40,000. Million dollar home, you have $300,000 in debt, you have $6, $700,000 in equity. One million, pay off the 300,000. The equity that remains is 700,000, which is yours.

Let’s talk a little bit about how to use home equity loans and home equity lines of credit to tap into the equity in your home and to accelerate your wealth building process. First, let’s talk about home equity loans. A home equity loan you borrow at a fixed amount. The payments are fixed. Your interest rate is fixed. The payments are fixed. You get a lump sum today and you are basically making payments over the 10, the 15, the 20-year term of the home equity loan, so you know what your payments are every month, and it’s predictable. No closing cost is listed on this screen, but please pay attention to that. You’re never going to take out a mortgage and have there be no cost. A lot of times, it’s just rolled into the back end. You take out 100,000, but your mortgage goes up by 103,000 or 104,000. There are always going to be costs there. Just pay attention to what they are and how does it affect your overall loan.

Interest, usually tax deductible. As of right now, the current laws in the United States allow for interest on mortgages to be tax deductible. The word usually is thrown in there because who knows if those laws are going to change in the future, but as of right now, interest on mortgage or your mortgage interest expense is tax deductible.

What is the difference between a home equity loan and a home equity line of credit? A home equity line of credit, you do not receive a lump sum. Basically, what you do is you’re basically taking $100,000 and tying that up. You basically are using the equity almost as a credit card. In that sense, you charge or you write a check for $5,000 and then you pay off that $5,000. Now you have $100,000 in available credit once again. You buy a car with your line of credit, and you spend $25,000 on that car. As you slowly pay off the $25,000 loan, that credit becomes available again. It’s like a credit card. It’s a more revolving line of credit than it is a loan. A loan you get a lump sum, payments are equal over the term of the loan. The line of credit acts more like a credit card, and also your interest rates are variable. They are usually capped or tied to an index.

You’ll have, I would say, if you start off with a 6% interest rate, it may be capped at 9, but over the life of this home equity line, you may not know exactly what your payments are. Your payments are going to be based on how much you spent or how much you borrowed and what the interest rate is at that particular time. Why would you use one versus the other? I’ll give you two examples of how they are used by investors to accelerate wealth building. Let’s say, for instance, I have a neighbor who wants to sell their property to me. They’re in no particular rush. I am very interested in the property. It’s maybe a multifamily and I know it’ll cash flow if I can just get in and rehab the property and put it back on the market with some new tenants. I’m going to tell my neighbor, “I’m going to take some equity out of my home, and I’m going to now use that equity as a down payment for a new mortgage so I can buy your property.”

In that case, I’m going to go after the home equity loan. I have a purpose. I already know what my purpose for taking this equity out of my home is to go purchase a new home. I would rather my payments be fixed so I can calculate them and I know what they are every single month. I”ll have two mortgages to worry about, two additional mortgages to worry about, the home equity loan, plus the new property loan. I’m most likely going to use the home equity loan as a down payment for my new loan to purchase my neighbor’s property. Depending on where you are in the country or how much equity you have in your home, if you have enough, you can borrow the entire purchase price from your home equity loan.

Why would I use the home equity line of credit? I do not have a neighbor who’s looking to sell, but I know I want to buy and investment property in the future. I want to have access to the cash. I know that when I make an offer on a property, a lot of times, I have to move quickly. I want to have access to the cash immediately and be able to write a check with no going to the bank. I already want my funds to be available so I can move quickly, and I do not know my purpose as of yet. I’d probably be in that situation be looking for a home equity line of credit that I can take, borrow against my house, and in anticipation of using that for some future purpose.

To sum it up, I would say home equity loan is I understand my purpose. I’m going. My purpose is there. I have an existing need for this money or an existing want. I’m going to go take out the loan. I’m going to make my payments fixed and predictable. I know that I want to do something in the future, but I’m not quite sure what it is just yet, but I want to have access to quick cash, I’m probably going to use the home equity line of credit to do that in the future.

One other way that you can tap into your home’s equity that’s not exactly listed here is doing a cashout refinance. Let’s say you have a house. It’s worth $500,000, and you owe $200,000 on that piece of property. Instead of having two mortgages, instead of having your first existing mortgage and then a home equity loan on top of that as a second mortgage, you basically do a cashout refinance. You want to pay off the existing 200,000 and then take out an additional 100,000 or 50,000 or whatever it may be into one new mortgage. My new mortgage is going to be 300,000, paying off the old mortgage of 200,000, and putting $100,000 into my pocket. That is called a cashout refinance of your mortgage, and that is another way that you can tap into cash, as well.

Hopefully, this was helpful. If you are looking for mortgage brokers that you would like to speak to about home equity loans or home equity lines of credit, we work with some of the best in the business, especially here in Boston. Please click on the link below in the video description. Fill out the quick form. Tell us what you’re looking for. We would love to connect you with some of the people that we work with on a regular basis. Thanks for watching.

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Ten investment terms you must know as a Boston real estate investor

If you want to invest in Boston real estate, or real estate in any part of the country, here are the 10 terms or concepts you must be familiar with. These are the topics of concern and equations that show up in every real estate transaction.

1 Debt to Income Ratio (DTI):

DTI is a financial measure banks and lenders use to determine whether you can afford to purchase a particular property. It measures the amount of monthly liability you have compared to your monthly income. A high debt to income ratio will tell the banks that you cannot, or should not take on any more debt. For example, if you have auto loans, credit cards, school loans, and an existing mortgage that total $3000 per month with a gross monthly income of $4000 per month, you have a 75% DTI. $3000 in expenses divided by $4000 in income equals .75. While this may be perfectly acceptable to most individuals, banks typically do not like to loan to individuals with a DTI above 50%. You can decrease your DTI by consolidating or lowering your expenses, or increasing your income. Rental income does count toward your DTI measure.

2 Loan-to-value (LTV):

 If you own a property that has a market value of $100,000, and the mortgage on that property is $80,000, you have a loan-to-value ratio of 80%. $80,000 divided by $100,000 equals .80, or 80%. This is important to you as an investor because banks often look at this measure to determine their risk before lending you money. The lower the debt compared to the value, the lower your LTV number is. The lower your LTV, the better this loan is for the banks and the more likely you are to get favorable financing. You can lower the properties LTV by placing a larger down payment, or making improvements that increase the property’s value.

3 Equity:

If you have a property valued at 400,000, and a mortgage on that same property of 300,000, you have $100,000 in equity within the property. Your equity is determined simply by the value of the property minus the debt. The equity is yours to do what you wish. You can sell this particular property and walk away with 100,000. You can’t refinance this property and pull out some of your equity. As the property value grows and as you continue to pay down your debt, your equity will continue to increase.

4 Deed:

The deed for the property shows ownership. It is also called the title. When you own property your name is placed on the deed along with any other owners. Here in Boston that deed is recorded at the Suffolk County Registry of Deeds and is a public document.

5 Lien:

 A lien is someone else’s financial claim against your property. If you don’t pay your taxes to the state they will put a municipal lien against your home. If you don’t pay your contractor he or she may put a mechanics lien on your property.

6 Mortgage:

The most common lien against your property is called a mortgage. Most people cannot afford to buy a home in New England without borrowing money from the bank. The bank will lend you money to purchase your home and in exchange they place a lien against your property for the balance due. You will not be able to sell a property and tell all liens have been removed and claims against the property have been settled. While you own the home via the deed, if you do not pay your mortgage the bank could take the property (Collateral) from you.

7 LLC: (Limited Liability Company)

An LLC is an entity in which many investors hold property. An LLC provides these investors with protection against financial claims. When you own investment property in your personal name and there is a claim against that property, your personal assets can also be attacked. Owning a property within an LLC insulates that liability and protects you personally. The individual making the claim can only go after the assets of the LLC.

8 Appreciation:

Appreciation the increase in your property’s value over time. The value of land and real estate can go down but more often than not increases in value as time goes on. The longer you own a piece of property the more likely you are to experience a good amount of appreciation.

9 Net Worth:

Your net worth is the total amount of assets you own, minus your total liabilities. An asset is anything you own that holds value. It could be cash, jewelry, furniture, antiques, real estate or variety of other things. A liability is that that you have someone else. It could be a credit card, student loans, personal loans, a mortgage or various other debts. If you total all of your assets in total all of your liabilities then subtract your liabilities from your assets you will calculate your net worth. As an investor, if your NW number is negative, the goal is to get to a positive position. If the number is already positive your goal should be to grow this number.

10 Cash flow:

When you own rental property you have income via your rents, and expenses like your mortgage, taxes, insurance, water, and repairs. Cash flow is simply your income minus your expenses. For example if you are collecting $1000 a month for each of your for tenants you have a total income of $4000 monthly. If all of your expenses equal $2500 per month, you have a cash flow of $1500 per month (or 4000-2500). If you can increase rents and (or) reduce your expenses, you will ultimately increase your cash flow and the money going into your pocket.

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You Don’t Need 20% Down To Own A Home In Boston

There are many would-be homeowners out there that have been misled about their ability to afford a home in Boston. We have some of the highest real estate prices in the country and the misconception that you can’t purchase a home without 20% down has led a lot of people away. Here are five mortgage programs that require significantly less out of pocket money.

Mass Housing Home Mortgage

Mass housing loans is a state-funded program to help homebuyers within Massachusetts. Mass housing allows buyers to purchase a home with a minimum of 3% out of pocket.  The big benefit of mass housing is that you do not pay PMI on these loans. The downside to mass housing, is that there are income qualifications and you do have to take a first-time home buyers course to be eligible for the loan.

FHA Mortgage Loans

FHA (Federal housing administration) home loan programs are probably the most popular throughout the country for individuals who are not capable of placing a 20% down payment. The FHA loan program allows for a 3.5% down payment and a minimum credit score 580. If you’re purchasing a home for $400,000 the down payment or an FHA loan would be roughly $14,000, opposed to $60,000 if 20% was required. You do however pay a little more for the ability to put less down. An FHA loan requires you to pay PMI (or private mortgage insurance). This is insurance the government makes you pay for not having a loan to value of 80/20. Once your home appreciates, or your debt is paid down to a point we are mortgage is 80% or less of your home’s value, you can refinance out of the FHA loan and remove the PMI requirement. Another positive of the FHA program, is that it allows family members to help you contribute to your down payment.

203K HomeLoans

A 203k loan is similar to an FHA loan with an added bonus. The 203K loan allows you to borrow additional funds to make repairs to the property you purchase. For example, you can purchase a home for 300,000, and borrow an additional 30,000 for a kitchen and bathroom makeover.

5% Down Conventional Mortgage

There are also conventional mortgage programs that allow for a 5 to 10% down payment. There are no homebuyers courses,  income restrictions or PMI to pay, that you may receive a slightly higher interest rate.

VA (Veterans Administration) Home Loans

VA helps  Service members, Veterans, and eligible surviving spouses become homeowners. VA does not require a down payment to purchase a home. If your income qualifies you can finance 100% of the cost of your home.

Click Here to Find Local Lenders

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You Should Buy An Investment Property Before Your Primary Home. Here’s Why:

VIDEO: Many would be investors start thinking about investing in real estate too late in the game. Here are a couple few why you should start thinking about real estate investing long before you buy your dream home.

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Do You Have A Bank America Pre-Approval? 4 Reasons You Should Toss It In The Trash!

 Thinking about getting your home loan with the same institution where you do your banking? This may not be the best option for you if you bank with a large commercial lender. Here are 4 reasons why going smaller is better when you shop for a mortgage.

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Secrets to Paying Off Your Mortgage Ahead of Time

 While the American dream may be to own a home, my dream is to own a home FREE and CLEAR. Although a process and a long term goal, the benefits far outweigh the disadvantages of paying off your mortgage early. Even if you are not making $100,000/yr, any additional money you put toward your principal helps you in the long run. You may not see it initially but trust me… it matters over the life of the loan. 

Did you know that less than 20 percent of U.S. homeowners have paid down 50 percent or more of their mortgage?   This does not have to be your statistic. By making a few simple changes you will soon be on the road to becoming mortgage-free!

Set Attainable Goals

Decide how fast you want to pay off your mortgage. How soon can you afford to pay it off? Knowing how soon you want to pay it off will allow you to figure out how much money to add to your monthly payment to accomplish that goal. Knowing the additional money needed helps you figure out what expenses you can cut from your life.

Create a Budget

We all  know that we need a goal, a plan and deadlines to succeed. I do not know of a successful person who just goes through life “doing.” There is usually always a goal and a list of items/plan to complete in order to accomplish the goal. Once you set the goal of paying off your mortgage in “x” years, we need need to create a budget to achieve the goal. Figure out your monthly income and your monthly expenses.  See where you can free up money by reallocating some things. Then, figure out how much more you can add to your monthly mortgage payment. Be sure to write that the extra goes toward your principle or else they will put it toward your interest which defeats the purpose. 

Cut the Fat

We all hate when we have to live on the bare necessities but in order to build wealth and pay down your mortgage, sacrifices need to be made. I would much rather make the sacrifice today in not having my daily coffee or show subscription in exchange for paying off my mortgage early. Let’s say I am able to pay off my mortgage in 15 years if I live “broke” on purpose. That means, in 15 years I could buy all the shoes I want with the extra money I’m saving by not having a mortgage. Sacrifice $200-$1000/mo now  to essentially earn an extra $2000 for life later?… I’ll take that ALL DAY!

Large Payments

Tax season comes every year without fail. Most of us anticipate a refund check. Most of us also have that money “spent” before we receive it for things such as vacation, new TV, Car down payment… Invest in your future and use that lump sum toward your principle. You will be happy you did sooner than you think. We are a society of immediate gratification, we need to think long term if we ever have a chance at building wealth. 

Refinance

Refinancing gives you the ability to obtain a better interest rate. Even if you have the same interest rate… you could potentially lower your monthly payments by virtue of the fact that you are now redistributing your loan repayment period to 30 years. For example, you purchased at at $200,000 and your mortgage was $1,500. Now you owe $150,000 with a refinance, your payment decreases to $1,100. All you did was refinance. Since you were able to afford $1,500 initially, now you should pay $1,100 with an additional $400 toward your principal. Couple that with any extra money you were able to save due to cutbacks…. your mortgage will be repaid in no time. 

Want more tips on how to pay off your mortgage? Send us a message to be connected to loan officers who can advise on your options. 

Contact Us

 

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Avoid These Financial Sins When Applying For a Mortgage

If you are planning to buy a home soon, make sure that you are aware of all the factors that can affect your ability to qualify for a mortgage approval. Many people think it is as easy as walking into a bank and saying ” I want to buy a home.” Banks are in the business of lending and making money… they need to ensure you are financially responsible and able to repay possibly the most money you have borrowed to date. To allow for a higher probability for an approval and the best terms, follow these 10 home buying commandments.

Thou shalt not change jobs, become self-employed, or quit your job.

Changing jobs resets the clock. You need 2 years of full time employment or employment within the same field to be a god candidate for a mortgage. Any sudden changes raises a red flag. 

Thou shalt not buy a car, truck, or van.

Do not incur any additional debt when you plan to purchase a home. This not only affects your debt-to-income ratio, it also affects your credit score. You essentially just borrowed against your home loan. BAD IDEA

Thou shalt not use credit cards excessively.

I think this is a no brainer but again, do not incur any additonal debt. It shows that you are not responsible financially.

Thou shalt not miss payments.

Your credit score is made up of history of payments. If you show lenders you cannot repay your current debt… do you think they are more or less likely to approve you to take on more debt?

Thou shalt not spend money you have set aside for down payment and closing costs.

Purchasing a home is expensive, let’s be honest. Do not spend ANY money until you have keys to yout new place. There are usually surprise costs so be prepared. 

Thou shalt not buy furniture.

Again, NO SHOPPING until you are the legal owner of the property.

Thou shalt not originate any inquires into your credit.

Do not apply for any other credit, loans etc until AFTER you own your home. Inquiries raise red flags.

Thou shalt not make large deposits without checking with your loan officer.

EVERY DOLLAR needs to be accounted for. Do not make deposits or large withdrawals from your account without checking with your loan officer. They can advise on what to do, how to “source” your money etc. This goes back to money laundering, they need to ensure it is your money and not someone using you to “clean” their money.

Thou shalt not change bank accounts.

DO NOT CHANGE ANYTHING that affects your finances in any way until you take ownership of the home. 

Thou shalt not co-sign a loan for anyone.

DO NOT and i repeat DO NOT co-sign for anyone for anything. I have 2 kids and I already let them know… I will not be co-signing for student loans, car loans, nothing. If they laps on payment, it affects your credit score. Their debt also becomes your debt and impacts your debt-to-income ratio.

 

I hope these commandments help you as you start thinking of purchasing a home. Check back on our site for more information on how to make yourself the best candidate for a mortgage approval. 

Email us your questions and we will create a blog post on them to assist others searching for the same information. CONTACT@MANDRELLCO.COM

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The last topic that we covered in our sit down with Anastasia Tacewicz from GMH Mortgage Services was some of the things you want to be considering when choosing a mortgage professional. This is a key individual throughout the home buying process so you will really want to do your due diligence when selecting someone to work with. Anastasia is a great reference as she is someone who we have worked with in the past and have had great experiences with.

Need more info about mortgages or about getting pre approved? Contact us at 617-297-8641

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Another topic that we covered in our sit down with Anastasia Tacewicz from GMH Mortgage Services was the process of purchasing a condo vs. a single family and how the two differ. For those potentially in the process of looking at both options right now, there is some good information in this video from the perspective of someone who would actually be involved with you when considering your purchase.

Need more info about mortgages or about getting pre approved? Contact us at 617-297-8641

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Today we sat down and talked with Anastasia Tacewicz from GMH Mortgage Services on a couple different topics. One such topic had to do with different strategies one can implement to improve their current credit score or simply establish credit without much of a history. If you have done any sort of credit research, you know that there is a ton of different information out there regarding this topic. It almost seems like everyone has a different perspective on how to best handle your credit so it’s great to hear one from a mortgage professional.



Need more info about mortgages or about getting pre approved? Contact us at 617-297-8641

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With mortgage rates remaining near historic lows, many financial experts are making the case that student-loan debt doesn’t have to hold back millennials from buying a home. But the message isn’t getting across: Nearly 70 percent of millennials say they are delaying a real estate purchase because of their student debt load, according to a new survey by CommonBond.

Forbes.com recently highlighted whether a person with student-loan debt was ready to become a home owner with the following assessment:

  • Debt-to-income ratio isn’t everything. Yes, the proportion of your income that goes toward paying your debt is a central determinant of whether you’re ready to buy a home. Most lenders require a debt-to-income ratio of 36 percent or less to qualify for a mortgage. But a buyer with student-loan debt shouldn’t worry that their number will automatically disqualify them. The key is that they pay their bills on time and still have enough income left over to compensate for their debt.
  • You can still handle more debt. Life is all about balance. Take a serious look at your monthly budget/income. You either need to have a large enough cushion (20% down payment) or calculate what your monthly expenses would be to own a home. If the cost of owning is around the same as renting (all included), then you should be adjusting and preparing to purchase. The best interest rates tend to go to those who can offer a 20 percent down payment, but loans are available that require as little as 3 percent down on a home.
  • Make a budget. To save for the down payment, would-be buyers need a budget in place. Katie Brewer, a certified financial planner in Dallas, suggests budgeting with broad buckets: fixed expenses, variable expenses, and longer-term goals (e.g. paying down debt, buying a home, or saving for retirement). Brewer recommends keeping fixed expenses to 50 percent or less of your overall budget. There’s no one budget style that is more effective, however. The important part is to just pick a method and then start working toward the goal — saving for a down payment, in this case. With the Boston rental market being as aggressive as it is… It may be a great idea to downsize for a bit so you can save. Get Roommates, Eat out less, Decrease leisure spending. You have to tweak your “budget” to what makes logical and financial sense to you. I am a firm believer in those who want something bad enough…will do everything in their power to make it happen. The question then becomes: HOW BAD DO YOU WANT IT?

If You would like more strategies on saving up for a home or would like to speak with one of our trusted mortgage lenders for more strategies on preparing for home ownership, please email us at Buy@MandrellCo.com.

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Mortgage Rates Slowly Rising

For the third consecutive week, mortgage rates inched higher, but potential home buyers shouldn’t sweat it too much. Mortgage rates are still hovering below levels from a year ago. When evaluating interest rates, it matters for your monthly payment adjustments. If a .2% increase only changes your monthly payment by a couple dollars, no need to worry. However, a rate change that affects your monthly payment by hundreds of dollars, warrants a closer look and re-evaluating your situation. 

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages with mortgage rates for the week ending March 17:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgage (FRM) averaged 3.73 percent with an average 0.5 point for the week ending March 17, 2016, up from last week when it averaged 3.68 percent. A year ago at this time, the 30-year FRM averaged 3.78 percent. 
  • 15-year FRM this week averaged 2.99 percent with an average 0.4 point, up from last week when it averaged 2.96 percent. A year ago at this time, the 15-year FRM averaged 3.06 percent. 
  • 5-year Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) averaged 2.93 percent this week with an average 0.5 point, up from last week when it averaged 2.92 percent. A year ago, the 5-year ARM averaged 2.97 percent.

Considering getting Pre-Approved? Need recommendations on lenders? Send us an email and we can forward some suggestions. Contact@mandrellco.com

Source: Freddie Mac
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Foreclosures Continue to Climb as Winter Arrives

Although the national foreclosure rate has dropped, Massachusetts’ rates continues to rise, according to data from The Warren Group. Foreclosure petitions were just around 5,000 in 2008, decreased to to under 1,500 in 2013 and is around 2,000  currently. Prior to the big crash, the entire foreclosure process took 6 months to move from petition to auction. Now, on average, the process takes about 15 months. The foreclosures occurring now are from five years ago. They were caught in limbo with lenders and the influx of properties on their case load. Now, lenders are starting to off-load properties from their books. 

The current spike in foreclosures is very different from the 2005-2010 crash numbers. Unemployment is lower and home values are higher today. In some instances, Homeowner’s in foreclosure now, have a better chance of walking away with money in their pocket if they sell their property rather than having it foreclosed on. Due to the rising home prices in our aggressive Boston market, homeowners have the potential to sell for a profit or refinance on better terms if they are able to make up missed payments. 

The Mandrell Company specializes in helping homeowners figure out the best strategy for their specific situation. If you are a homeowner facing possible foreclosure, call for a no obligation consultation. We will provide information on lenders who are willing to work with you to refinance and save your home or evaluate the numbers and see if you have an opportunity to make a profit on the sale. 

It hurts to see someone lose their home when they owe $200,000 but their home is worth $350,000 if they were to sell. They walk away with $0, bad credit and no home as opposed to $150,000 in profit and an opportunity to invest that money to improve their financial situation. 

 

To speak with our Broker directly, please contact us NOW! at 617-297-8641

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Mortgage Rates Remain Low Despite Boston Values Skyrocketing

 Freddie Mac (OTCQB: FMCC) today released the results of its Primary Mortgage Market Survey® (PMMS®), showing the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate declining for the third consecutive week on disappointing national manufacturing data. While many cities and towns across the country seem to still be feeling parts of the recession, Boston’s economy (and as a result our home values) seem to be flourishing. The consistency in low mortgage rates are allowing Boston borrowers to also pull equity from their homes and make improvements and repairs.

News Facts

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgage (FRM) averaged 3.93 percent with an average 0.6 point for the week ending December 3, 2015, down from last week when it averaged 3.95 percent. A year ago at this time, the 30-year FRM averaged 3.89 percent. 
  • 15-year FRM this week averaged 3.16 percent with an average 0.5 point, down from last week when it averaged 3.18 percent. A year ago at this time, the 15-year FRM averaged 3.10 percent. 
  • 5-year Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) averaged 2.99 percent this week with an average 0.5 point, down from last week when it averaged 3.01 percent. A year ago, the 5-year ARM averaged 2.94 percent.
  • 1-year Treasury-indexed ARM averaged 2.61 percent this week with an average 0.3 point, up from 2.59 percent last week. At this time last year, the 1-year ARM averaged 2.41 percent. 

Would you like to speak with a mortgage broker about buying a home or refinancing an existing mortgage? Call us at 617-297-8641 to be connected with some of the best home loan professionals in the city!

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How Much Equity Will I Have In My Home 10 Years From Now?

Have you ever wished you could take a look into the future and see what things are like? Do you own a home and wish you could estimate the amount of equity you’d have at any given point in the future? If so, we have two videos just for you!

A property’s equity is made of of two simple factors; the value of the home and the amount owed on the mortgage. Simply put, your homes value (the asset) minus the amount of your current mortgage(s) (the liability) = equity. For example, if you own a home worth $500,000 and the current balance of all mortgages is $300,000, you have $200,000 in home equity.

Great! I know both of these numbers today, but how do I determine these two values 10 years from now? Good question! The two short videos below are going to show you just how to do that.

The 1st video takes you through the use of an amortizing mortgage calculator. This calculator will help you determine the principal balance of your mortgage at any point in the future. In addition to the use of this calculator, you should have received a loan amortization schedule with your mortgage documents.

 

The 2nd video is a compounding calculator. A compounding calculator will assist you in estimating the future value of your home. Once you’ve estimated your homes future value, you can simply subtract your future mortgage balance and BAM! There you have it. A quick look into the future!

 

Would you like to view more real estate videos like these? Subscribe to our You tube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/wmandrell

 

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Credit affects all major financial decisions that involve someone lending you money/credit. It should be no surprise that your credit score will also affect your mortgage rate. Your credit scores affect the kinds of mortgages you can be approved for, how much you can borrow, the mortgage rates you’ll pay and even how much you’ll pay for private mortgage insurance (PMI). It’s not impossible to buy a home with damaged credit; it’s just much more expensive.
Credit scores are instrumental in applying and being approved for a mortgage. When it comes to FHA financing at least, you will be required to have a credit score of at least 580 in order to be eligible for a loan. The higher your credit score is beyond that, the better the terms will be. With a 580 credit score you also qualify for the low 3.5% down. If your credit score is below 580, you can still qualify for an FHA loan but you will need a 10% down payment. The drawback to a 580 is that your interest rate will not be at the national average, it will most likely be slightly higher. Consult your mortgage lender for more information. (We work with several lenders who work hard to get you the best rate, to be connected to one of them, please click here)
This is why it’s so important to understand your credit score in the months before you apply for a mortgage. If you do have impaired credit history, you’ll want to work to improve your credit scores before you even apply. And if you already have good credit, you’ll want to keep it as high as possible by avoiding taking on other new debt.
We host seminars throughout the year regarding improving credit and have affiliations with credit repair companies.
For more information, feel free to contact us.

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**Your lender decides what you can borrow but you decide what you can afford.**

When you make the decision to purchase a home, it is worth your time to consider total expenses and mortgage payments in your decision.
Lenders are careful, but they make qualification decisions based on averages and formulas. They do not take into account the nuances of your spending patterns and responsibilities. So, leave a little room for the unexpected, as well as the obvious new opportunities your home will give you to spend money, from furnishings, to landscaping, to repairs.
No matter how expensive your market though, we urge you to think carefully before stretching your budget quite so much.
Deciding how much you can afford should involve some careful attention to how your financial profile may change in the coming years. In the long run, your own peace of mind and security will matter most.
If you or your spouse suddenly became unemployed, would you be able to cover your mortgage and other expenses?
Would you be able to maintain your current lifestyle with your new mortgage payments?
Would you be able to pay your mortgage with the addition of a child?
Would you have money for emergencies (car troubles, broken heater)?
These are all things you need to think about when deciding to purchase a home. It is an investment into your future and you want to make a wise choice. To learn more about investing in real estate visit BostonWealthBuilders.com or schedule a no obligation consultation today!

 

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What Credit Score Do I Need To Purchase A Home?

Are you thinking it’s time to purchase a home but not sure you’re credit score meets minimum requirements? In a video interview, Chris Graves of Sierra Pacific Mortgage, talks about credit scores and exactly what’s needed to make sure your mortgage application gets approved. If you have any additional questions, or would like to get yourself pre-approved for a mortgage, complete the form below and your information will be sent directly to Chris’s inbox.

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Buying A Home In Dorchester? Get A Pre-Approval Before You Start Shopping!

Are you thinking now would be a good time to buy that house I’ve always wanted? Have you started visiting local Open House(s) and learning a little about what the neighborhood has to offer? Great. You’re on the right path to home-ownership but let’s not forget one crucial step. The pre-approval process! Getting yourself pre-approval for a mortgage is important so you fully understand where you are financially and what you can afford to spend. During the process your mortgage broker will be able to tell you, how much you can afford, what interest rates are doing, and what you can look forward to as a final monthly payment when taxes and insurance are added in. During the pre-approval process you should also speak with your mortgage broker about all the differing loan programs available to you and the pros and cons of each.

Chris Graves, of Sierra Pacific Mortgage, breaks down the pre-approval process in this 2 min video. Chris is an very experienced mortgage loan officer and is available to help answer any questions you may have about getting a loan. If you still have questions about obtaining a mortgage pre-approval and would like to speak with Chris directly, please complete the contact form below and your message will be sent directly to Chris’s email.

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Purchase A $350,000 Home With An FHA Loan & Down Payment Of Only $12,250

Have you considered buying a home but can’t afford a 20% down payment on the mortgage? You’re not alone! Many home buyers (especially in New England) cannot afford to shell out $40,000 – $80,000 just to get into your average Boston home. Fortunately there’s another option. FHA (Federal Housing Administration) loans are extremely popular mortgage programs because of their lower down payment requirements and less stringent lending guidelines. With this mortgage program, home buyers can obtain a home mortgage with as little as 3.5% of of the purchase price. For your average Massachusetts home (approximately $350,000) that roughly $12,250…a much more affordable and achievable number.  FHA borrowers can use their own savings to make the down payment, but other allowed sources of cash include a gift from a family member or a grant from the government. Another benefit to the FHA program is that is allows individuals with less than perfect credit to obtain a loan. Borrowers need a credit score of just 580 or higher to meet requirements.

Note: An FHA loan may also used to purchase a 2-4 four family home. Many individuals purchase their 1st investments property with FHA or similar “owner occupied” home loan. FHA does require that an individual move into the property for a specific period of time but does not require the borrower to remain in the property for the life of the loan. Talk to your local real estate agent and mortgage broker about whether or not this program is good tool for your purchasing needs.

The FHA allows home sellers, builders and lenders to pay some of the borrower’s closing costs, such as an appraisal, credit report or title expenses. Because the FHA is not a lender, but rather an insurer, borrowers need to get their loan through an FHA-approved lender (as opposed to directly from the FHA). Not all FHA-approved lenders offer the same interest rate and costs — even on the same FHA loan.

The FHA has a special loan product for borrowers who need extra cash to make repairs to their homes. The chief advantage of this type of loan, called a 203(k), is that the loan amount is based not on the current appraised value of the home but on the projected value after the repairs are completed. A so-called “streamlined” 203(k) allows the borrower to finance up to $35,000 in nonstructural repairs, such as painting and replacing cabinets or fixtures.

For more information about FHA loans to get yourself pre-approved for a mortgage, please give us a call at 617-297-8641. We can connect you with one of our local mortgage specialist and get you on your way to home ownership.

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There are two very important investment calculators buy and hold investors should pay more attention to. Both of these calculators are forward looking and help investors predict the future of there real estate holdings.

The 1st of these two calculators in what’s called a “compounding calculator”. The compounding feature can help us estimate property values at a given point in the future. Say for instance, we purchased an investment property today at $550,000 and we want to know where we’ll stand in 10 years. Let’s then assumed the value increases at an average of 3% per year (which is a relatively safe assumption for the Boston Market). If our assumption hold true, at the end of year 10 this property would be worth almost $740,000 which is nearly $200,00 more than we paid for the property.

The 2nd of these two is simply a mortgage calculator with an “amortization schedule” attached. Assuming you make all your monthly mortgage payments on time, an amortization schedule will show you what your (principal) mortgage balance will be after every month.

Let’s go back to our investment purchase of $550,000 and assume we purchased this property with a 20% down payment ($110,000). Let’s also assume we financed the remaining balance ($440,000) at a rate of 4%, with a 30 year amortizing loan. If we looked 10 years down the road (payment number 120) we would find a principal balance of roughly $340,000.

We the combination of these two calculators we’ve been able to make some predictions as to what our investment will look like 10 years from now. With the $110,000 down payment we were able to secure this investment property and leverage the remaining balance. At the end of 10 years you will own a property worth $740,000 and have a mortgage balance of $340,00.

$740,000 Value – $340,000 Debt  = $400,000 Your Equity.

If you sold this property after 10 year you would have nearly quadrupled your initial invest $110,000. Your equity position would have grown 400% or an average of 40% annually. This doesn’t include any cash flows you received from the property over this 10 year period.

You can find both of these calculator with the links below!

http://www.amortization-calc.com/

http://www.moneychimp.com/calculator/compound_interest_calculator.htm

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Boston Investment Specialist

 

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One of the largest obstacles between you and home ownership is coming up with enough money fund the required mortgage down-payment.  Let’s assume that we’re looking for the average single family home in Massachusetts which is roughly $350,000. Let’s also assume you are like the majority of home buyers in this state and qualify for an FHA Loan, which is a 3.5% down payment or roughly $12,250. This isn’t amount of money most people have sitting in there bank accounts. So how do you find the cash to fund your dreams of home-ownership? Here are a list of things most buyers do to save up some cash:

Side Job or Temp Work –  Can you pick up a side job or work for a temp agency?  It’s may not be something you  ant to do permanently, but it’s worth it to reach your home-ownership goals.  Let’s assume you can pick up a part time job working 10 hours per week at $15 per hour. If you worked 48 of 52 weeks in the year you’d have an extra $7200 (before taxes) to add to your home savings account.

Cut Cable & Phone Bill – Many of us have Comcast or Verizon packages that consist of every movie channel, sport package and various other upgrades. Are these things we can live without for a little while?  The same goes for many phone bills. Many of us are paying $40 per month or more for data packages while the only thing we do with our phone that require data is posting to Facebook.  If you can reduce one of these bills by $50 or two of them by $25 each, you would be saving a total of $600 for the year.

Cut Gift Spending – We all love our family and friends but could you cut back on birthday and holiday gifts for one year? I think your friends and family would stand by you if your gift were less expensive this year because you’re saving to purchase a home.  Statistics show cutting this spending out entirely can put another $600 in your pocket for the year.

Work Overtime – Are there overtime hours available at your current job? Maybe it’s time to stay late or come in early. It may be a good idea to approach your manager and see what extra hours he/she can offer you.

Save Your Tax Returns – Getting a nice check back from the government this year? Don’t view this influx of cash as discretionary spending. Many Americans look at this check(s) as chance to buy a bigger TV or various other luxuries.  Be smart and save this money for your down payment.  The big screen will look better next year in your new home.

Hang At Home – Let’s assume that you’re like most of us and you love to hang out on the weekends. If you’re spending an average of $100 per weekend (drinks, food, movies etc) and your going out every other weekend, you’re spending an average of $2600 per year on entertainment. Can you cut than down this year to just 1 weekend per month? If so you’re saving $1300 per year and you’re that much closer to you saving goals.

Cut Your 401K Contributions – I’m a big believer in saving for your retirement, but I believe even more that every individual should own their own home. It may be a good idea for you to speak with your HR department and cut down (or cut out) your retirement contributions and add those additional funds to your savings.

Ask Your Family For Help – When your family sees all the lifestyle adjustments you’ve made to save for home ownership, they will see how important it is to you and will become important to them as well.  Can they help you with your down payment?

Are you looking for more helpful home ownership tips? Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WMandrell.

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