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All posts tagged Equity

First talk a little bit about what equity is. Equity is the value that you have in your home, the difference between the market value of the property and the debt on the property. If you have $100,000 home, a home that’s worth $100,000, you owe $60,000 on that home, you have $40,000 in equity. Simplest explanation, 100,000 minus $60,000 in debt. If you sold the property today, you’d walk away with $40,000. Million dollar home, you have $300,000 in debt, you have $6, $700,000 in equity. One million, pay off the 300,000. The equity that remains is 700,000, which is yours.

Let’s talk a little bit about how to use home equity loans and home equity lines of credit to tap into the equity in your home and to accelerate your wealth building process. First, let’s talk about home equity loans. A home equity loan you borrow at a fixed amount. The payments are fixed. Your interest rate is fixed. The payments are fixed. You get a lump sum today and you are basically making payments over the 10, the 15, the 20-year term of the home equity loan, so you know what your payments are every month, and it’s predictable. No closing cost is listed on this screen, but please pay attention to that. You’re never going to take out a mortgage and have there be no cost. A lot of times, it’s just rolled into the back end. You take out 100,000, but your mortgage goes up by 103,000 or 104,000. There are always going to be costs there. Just pay attention to what they are and how does it affect your overall loan.

Interest, usually tax deductible. As of right now, the current laws in the United States allow for interest on mortgages to be tax deductible. The word usually is thrown in there because who knows if those laws are going to change in the future, but as of right now, interest on mortgage or your mortgage interest expense is tax deductible.

What is the difference between a home equity loan and a home equity line of credit? A home equity line of credit, you do not receive a lump sum. Basically, what you do is you’re basically taking $100,000 and tying that up. You basically are using the equity almost as a credit card. In that sense, you charge or you write a check for $5,000 and then you pay off that $5,000. Now you have $100,000 in available credit once again. You buy a car with your line of credit, and you spend $25,000 on that car. As you slowly pay off the $25,000 loan, that credit becomes available again. It’s like a credit card. It’s a more revolving line of credit than it is a loan. A loan you get a lump sum, payments are equal over the term of the loan. The line of credit acts more like a credit card, and also your interest rates are variable. They are usually capped or tied to an index.

You’ll have, I would say, if you start off with a 6% interest rate, it may be capped at 9, but over the life of this home equity line, you may not know exactly what your payments are. Your payments are going to be based on how much you spent or how much you borrowed and what the interest rate is at that particular time. Why would you use one versus the other? I’ll give you two examples of how they are used by investors to accelerate wealth building. Let’s say, for instance, I have a neighbor who wants to sell their property to me. They’re in no particular rush. I am very interested in the property. It’s maybe a multifamily and I know it’ll cash flow if I can just get in and rehab the property and put it back on the market with some new tenants. I’m going to tell my neighbor, “I’m going to take some equity out of my home, and I’m going to now use that equity as a down payment for a new mortgage so I can buy your property.”

In that case, I’m going to go after the home equity loan. I have a purpose. I already know what my purpose for taking this equity out of my home is to go purchase a new home. I would rather my payments be fixed so I can calculate them and I know what they are every single month. I”ll have two mortgages to worry about, two additional mortgages to worry about, the home equity loan, plus the new property loan. I’m most likely going to use the home equity loan as a down payment for my new loan to purchase my neighbor’s property. Depending on where you are in the country or how much equity you have in your home, if you have enough, you can borrow the entire purchase price from your home equity loan.

Why would I use the home equity line of credit? I do not have a neighbor who’s looking to sell, but I know I want to buy and investment property in the future. I want to have access to the cash. I know that when I make an offer on a property, a lot of times, I have to move quickly. I want to have access to the cash immediately and be able to write a check with no going to the bank. I already want my funds to be available so I can move quickly, and I do not know my purpose as of yet. I’d probably be in that situation be looking for a home equity line of credit that I can take, borrow against my house, and in anticipation of using that for some future purpose.

To sum it up, I would say home equity loan is I understand my purpose. I’m going. My purpose is there. I have an existing need for this money or an existing want. I’m going to go take out the loan. I’m going to make my payments fixed and predictable. I know that I want to do something in the future, but I’m not quite sure what it is just yet, but I want to have access to quick cash, I’m probably going to use the home equity line of credit to do that in the future.

One other way that you can tap into your home’s equity that’s not exactly listed here is doing a cashout refinance. Let’s say you have a house. It’s worth $500,000, and you owe $200,000 on that piece of property. Instead of having two mortgages, instead of having your first existing mortgage and then a home equity loan on top of that as a second mortgage, you basically do a cashout refinance. You want to pay off the existing 200,000 and then take out an additional 100,000 or 50,000 or whatever it may be into one new mortgage. My new mortgage is going to be 300,000, paying off the old mortgage of 200,000, and putting $100,000 into my pocket. That is called a cashout refinance of your mortgage, and that is another way that you can tap into cash, as well.

Hopefully, this was helpful. If you are looking for mortgage brokers that you would like to speak to about home equity loans or home equity lines of credit, we work with some of the best in the business, especially here in Boston. Please click on the link below in the video description. Fill out the quick form. Tell us what you’re looking for. We would love to connect you with some of the people that we work with on a regular basis. Thanks for watching.

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Ten investment terms you must know as a Boston real estate investor

If you want to invest in Boston real estate, or real estate in any part of the country, here are the 10 terms or concepts you must be familiar with. These are the topics of concern and equations that show up in every real estate transaction.

1 Debt to Income Ratio (DTI):

DTI is a financial measure banks and lenders use to determine whether you can afford to purchase a particular property. It measures the amount of monthly liability you have compared to your monthly income. A high debt to income ratio will tell the banks that you cannot, or should not take on any more debt. For example, if you have auto loans, credit cards, school loans, and an existing mortgage that total $3000 per month with a gross monthly income of $4000 per month, you have a 75% DTI. $3000 in expenses divided by $4000 in income equals .75. While this may be perfectly acceptable to most individuals, banks typically do not like to loan to individuals with a DTI above 50%. You can decrease your DTI by consolidating or lowering your expenses, or increasing your income. Rental income does count toward your DTI measure.

2 Loan-to-value (LTV):

 If you own a property that has a market value of $100,000, and the mortgage on that property is $80,000, you have a loan-to-value ratio of 80%. $80,000 divided by $100,000 equals .80, or 80%. This is important to you as an investor because banks often look at this measure to determine their risk before lending you money. The lower the debt compared to the value, the lower your LTV number is. The lower your LTV, the better this loan is for the banks and the more likely you are to get favorable financing. You can lower the properties LTV by placing a larger down payment, or making improvements that increase the property’s value.

3 Equity:

If you have a property valued at 400,000, and a mortgage on that same property of 300,000, you have $100,000 in equity within the property. Your equity is determined simply by the value of the property minus the debt. The equity is yours to do what you wish. You can sell this particular property and walk away with 100,000. You can’t refinance this property and pull out some of your equity. As the property value grows and as you continue to pay down your debt, your equity will continue to increase.

4 Deed:

The deed for the property shows ownership. It is also called the title. When you own property your name is placed on the deed along with any other owners. Here in Boston that deed is recorded at the Suffolk County Registry of Deeds and is a public document.

5 Lien:

 A lien is someone else’s financial claim against your property. If you don’t pay your taxes to the state they will put a municipal lien against your home. If you don’t pay your contractor he or she may put a mechanics lien on your property.

6 Mortgage:

The most common lien against your property is called a mortgage. Most people cannot afford to buy a home in New England without borrowing money from the bank. The bank will lend you money to purchase your home and in exchange they place a lien against your property for the balance due. You will not be able to sell a property and tell all liens have been removed and claims against the property have been settled. While you own the home via the deed, if you do not pay your mortgage the bank could take the property (Collateral) from you.

7 LLC: (Limited Liability Company)

An LLC is an entity in which many investors hold property. An LLC provides these investors with protection against financial claims. When you own investment property in your personal name and there is a claim against that property, your personal assets can also be attacked. Owning a property within an LLC insulates that liability and protects you personally. The individual making the claim can only go after the assets of the LLC.

8 Appreciation:

Appreciation the increase in your property’s value over time. The value of land and real estate can go down but more often than not increases in value as time goes on. The longer you own a piece of property the more likely you are to experience a good amount of appreciation.

9 Net Worth:

Your net worth is the total amount of assets you own, minus your total liabilities. An asset is anything you own that holds value. It could be cash, jewelry, furniture, antiques, real estate or variety of other things. A liability is that that you have someone else. It could be a credit card, student loans, personal loans, a mortgage or various other debts. If you total all of your assets in total all of your liabilities then subtract your liabilities from your assets you will calculate your net worth. As an investor, if your NW number is negative, the goal is to get to a positive position. If the number is already positive your goal should be to grow this number.

10 Cash flow:

When you own rental property you have income via your rents, and expenses like your mortgage, taxes, insurance, water, and repairs. Cash flow is simply your income minus your expenses. For example if you are collecting $1000 a month for each of your for tenants you have a total income of $4000 monthly. If all of your expenses equal $2500 per month, you have a cash flow of $1500 per month (or 4000-2500). If you can increase rents and (or) reduce your expenses, you will ultimately increase your cash flow and the money going into your pocket.

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How Much Equity Will I Have In My Home 10 Years From Now?

Have you ever wished you could take a look into the future and see what things are like? Do you own a home and wish you could estimate the amount of equity you’d have at any given point in the future? If so, we have two videos just for you!

A property’s equity is made of of two simple factors; the value of the home and the amount owed on the mortgage. Simply put, your homes value (the asset) minus the amount of your current mortgage(s) (the liability) = equity. For example, if you own a home worth $500,000 and the current balance of all mortgages is $300,000, you have $200,000 in home equity.

Great! I know both of these numbers today, but how do I determine these two values 10 years from now? Good question! The two short videos below are going to show you just how to do that.

The 1st video takes you through the use of an amortizing mortgage calculator. This calculator will help you determine the principal balance of your mortgage at any point in the future. In addition to the use of this calculator, you should have received a loan amortization schedule with your mortgage documents.

 

The 2nd video is a compounding calculator. A compounding calculator will assist you in estimating the future value of your home. Once you’ve estimated your homes future value, you can simply subtract your future mortgage balance and BAM! There you have it. A quick look into the future!

 

Would you like to view more real estate videos like these? Subscribe to our You tube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/wmandrell

 

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Boston Area Mortgage Rates Remain Low Going Into 2016

MCLEAN, VA–(Marketwired – Oct 29, 2015) – Freddie Mac today released the results of its Primary Mortgage Market Survey® (PMMS®), showing average fixed mortgage rates falling slightly lower amid market expectations of no rate increase by the Federal Reserve.

News Facts

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgage (FRM) averaged 3.76 percent with an average 0.6 point for the week ending October 29, 2015, down from last week when it averaged 3.79 percent. A year ago at this time, the 30-year FRM averaged 3.98 percent. 
  • 15-year FRM this week averaged 2.98 percent with an average 0.6 point, unchanged from last week. A year ago at this time, the 15-year FRM averaged 3.13 percent. 
  • 5-year Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) averaged 2.89 percent this week with an average 0.4 point, unchanged from last week. A year ago, the 5-year ARM averaged 2.94 percent.
  • 1-year Treasury-indexed ARM averaged 2.54 percent this week with an average 0.2 point, down from 2.62 percent last week. At this time last year, the 1-year ARM averaged 2.43 percent. 

Are you considering buying a home or possibly refinancing your current mortgage? Looking for a qualified professional to provide some lending advice? Give us a call. We work with the best home loan resources in Massachusetts! We’d love to learn a little more about your needs and connect you with the right company for the job.

You can reach us at 617-297-8641 or contact@mandrellco.com

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