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How To Line Up Funding For Your Commercial Real Estate Deals

We talked briefly, if you watch prior videos, about residential lending and some of the basic mortgage programs. This is commercial lending. This is typically if you see on the screen, typically five units or more. Residential lending is a single family, two family, three, a triple decker or are four units.

Commercial lending tends to be five units or more. It can be something that’s less than five units if it’s held in a special purpose entity like an LLC. If you own the property individually and it’s under five units, it’s typically residential property or residential mortgage broker or a lender could help you. If it is five units or more or held in a special purpose entity like an LLC, then it is commercial lending.

Typically what you find with commercial lending it is performance based. When you’re dealing with residential lending you’re dealing with your credit score. You’re dealing with your debt to income ratio and you’re dealing with loan to value and a couple of other factors that affect you personally.

When you’re dealing with commercial lending, it’s more lenders are making the decision based on the performance of the property. When I say performance of the property I mean what rents are coming into the property? What is the rent roll for the property? What is the total gross rents that the property collects versus the total expenses or outlay of cash needed to operate the property on a monthly basis, on an annual basis?

Typically what commercial lenders like to see is what’s called a debt coverage ratio of let’s say 1 1/4 or 1.25 which means, I’ll give you the simplest example. If you have debt on the property or a mortgage on the property and that mortgage is about $1000 per month, most lenders like to see at least 1250 in income coming in or a 1.25 debt coverage ratio. They also want to see that the property is cash flowing on a regular basis. They want to see that you can sustain the property over a long period of time and that it is going to be successful for you. Again, it has less to do with your credit score and your personal debts. More to do with the property’s performance over time.

What else can we talk about commercial lending? Rates tend to be a little bit higher than residential lending. Typically a half a point I would say from my experience. You’re seeing a half a point, maybe a point more depending on the risk that the lender assumes with the property. Commercial lending can be recourse and nonrecourse as well. Nonrecourse loans means that you do not need to give a personal guaranty. If the property for some reason does not perform, and the note is not paid, you will not be personally liable for that. When you’re talking about residential mortgages, if you do not pay you get foreclosed on and that foreclosure goes onto your credit report there’s a ding there when you go to purchase another property.

If you are relatively new to the commercial lending space, most lenders probably will want you to give a personal guaranty to the LLC or the entity holding the property. Once you have a little bit more experience, or you hit a certain loan volume, a certain loan number, typically a million dollars you can usually look for a nonrecourse loans where you are not personally liable for that entity or the performance of that property if the property does not perform to expectations.

Last but not least, you are typically going to find LTV between 75 and 85% so loan to value ratios between 75 and 85%. Which means unlike residential lending where you can put as little as 0% down with a VA loan or a 3 1/2% down with FHA and 3% down with mass housing, most commercial lenders are going to want to see at least 15-25% what they call a skin in the game. They want you to have some equity into the property right off the top. That equity can be the equity pulled together by partners. You can have several owners of one LLC pulling funds together to make that down payment of 15-25%. That’s a lot of times what you see especially with properties of a million or two or three million dollars where it is unlikely that one individual has the capital or even if they do, wants to risk the capital themselves. You find that a lot of individuals tend to pool money together with two, three or more partners form that LLC to meet that down payment requirement.

That’s commercial lending in a nutshell. If you would like more information on commercial lending, or would like to be connected with some of our commercial lending contacts, please click the link in the description below and fill out the quick form. Tell us a little bit about yourself and we can connect you with one of our contacts, one of our lenders that we do business with.

Financing

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Never Pay Capital Gains Taxes On Your Investment Property Sale

What a 1031 exchange is, it basically is a tax vehicle that allows you to trade up to larger properties. Let’s say for instance you have a three family and you have some equity and you’re thinking about selling. If you sold that three family you are going to get hit with a capital gains tax, or you’re going to hit for capital gains taxes on the sale of that property.

If the value of the property went up, if you’ve obviously been taking a depreciation allowance every years so your basis is down, the federal and state government are going to say, “You received capital gains from this investment and you are going to get taxed on the sale. To avoid capital gains taxes and to use that money or the portion of tax that the federal government would have taken, to enhance your portfolio it makes a lot more sense to avoid those taxes and use that extra cash to grow your wealth and put it into the next property.

What a 1031 allows you to do is to avoid capital gains taxes, long as you’re following the IRS rules and you are trading up or using the proceeds of that sale to fund your next property. It’s typically used to trade up for a larger property. Let’s give you an example, I sold a $600,000 property and I bought it initially at, let’s say $400,000, I paid the debt down to three, and I was probably going to have a capital gain of let’s say around $200,000 on that property, if not a little bit more.

If I get hit with a capital gains tax and then use the proceeds to invest, I have less money to invest. A smarter, easier way would be to, not easier way but a more intelligent way, would be to use a 1031. Be within the law use a 1031 exchange to trade up to a larger property. Basically what you have to do is you have to use a 1031 exchange company and you have to follow certain guidelines to avoid that capital gains taxes. You have, I believe, identify a property within 60 days and close on that property within 90 days.

Those laws are changing depending on what administration is in, and where we are in housing and how the housing market is doing. Those are the type of things that you want to make sure, using a qualified company, because as those laws move and the rules change, you want to make sure that you are within compliance so you do not get audited or get hit with tax after the exchange

Make sure you’re following the time tables and identifying your property and purchasing and securing the property within a solid period of time. That’s what a 1031 exchange is. That’s how you can use it. Some of the best and the brightest real estate investors in the business are using 1031 exchanges over and over and over again to trade up to larger and larger properties and keep their money moving. They’re constantly keeping their money moving.

For more information about 1031 exchanges or to be connected with a 1031 exchange company, please click the link below in the description, tell us a little bit more about yourself and what you’re looking for. We can certainly connect you with some of the companies that we use on a regular basis. Thanks, hopefully this was helpful.

Financing

 

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Choosing A Real Estate Investing Partner? Consider These Factors 1st

Real estate can be expensive, a lot of work, and difficult to acquire. Partnering with another investor can be an excellent way to break into the business or continue your portfolio growth. But before you grab just any partner, here are four factors you must consider.

What are your timeline?
When investing in real estate with a business partner important consideration is your investment time. For example, if you are age 55 and investing for cash flow to supplement your retirement, while partnering with someone age 35 who is investing for long-term appreciation and portfolio growth, this partnership may not work out. You may be looking to sell the property and cash out in 10 years while your younger partner may be looking to hold on a bit longer. Not to say that you can only invest with people your age, but this is definitely a discussion you should have from the start of your venture. Even business partners of the same age should have the timeline discussion.

What are your investing goals?
Are you investing for cash flow or appreciation? Are you looking to invest in the city or suburbs? Locally or out of state investments? Are you looking to be active or passive with your rental property? Are you looking to buy a couple properties or build a large portfolio? These are some of the questions you and your potential business partner should ask each other before putting a deal together. If you, for instances, want to self manage a couple multifamily homes, while your potential partner wants to purchase a 50 unit building in a neighboring state, there is going to be a disconnect down the road.

Is this an ethical person?
There are a lot of choices to make when dealing with investment real estate and you must know that your partner is making decisions that are ethical, moral, and within the law. Is he or she creating a win-win when dealing directly with a seller? Does he or she avoid discriminatory practices when dealing with tenants? Is he or she truthful when dealing with loan officers? The things your partner does or doesn’t do will directly affect real estate and relationship you have together.

What do each of you bring to the table?
Experience, cash, and time are the three big factors that any one partner can bring to the investment table. You may have one partner who has years of experience investing in real estate, but lacks the additional investment capital for the current deal. If you partner this individual with someone who has cash and wants to learn more about the business, this may be a match made in heaven. What are your strengths and weaknesses? What about your potential partner? Have this critical conversation early on in the process. One person brings significantly more to the table than another partner, this doesn’t necessarily mean the partnership won’t work. Maybe the equity ownership within the property is divided accordingly.

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On December 14th, 2016 I finally closed on my first rental property! For over a year I have been educating myself as much as possible in real estate investing to one day finally take the plunge. That day finally came. A couple months ago, a property on the MLS cam back on the market. It was a 3-family in Mattapan that needed a decent amount of work to get it up to rental condition. Listed at 390k, I initially tried to get the property at 350k, a price that, once I ran numbers, felt would put me in the best position when it came time to refinance out of my purchasing loan, which I ultimately used hard money for. I submitted the offer with no contingencies, all cash and gave up the buyer’s side commission because I knew on the back end it would be worth it, but that was still not good enough and after some continued negotiation, had to settle for purchasing it at the full asking price. This would create additional challenges, but at the end of the day, if you believe in the deal, you’ll make it work.

Financing the deal was another challenge as I really wanted to find a lender that would finance a percentage of the purchase price and renovations. It was not until it was too late that I found a couple lenders where this was possible. At least for the next one, I will have this component lined up for a more streamlined process. I ultimately had to settle on using hard money, which is great for a short turnaround, but is so incredibly expensive to someone like me who hates to waste money. When it comes to hard money, if you have any other option, please use it instead.

Since the closing, it has been a mad scramble to start the renovations and make sure everyone is working constantly and as efficiently as possible. This is just another thing you will have to do when you slightly overpay for a property. Despite the challenges early on, I couldn’t be happier or more excited to have closed on my first rental property. Every day that passes makes me want to find the next deal more and more. Just always be ready for the more than likely roller coaster ride!

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