(MA) 617-297-8641 (RI) 401-641-5774

Contact@MandrellCo.com

Brand New Multifamily Home Coming To Market! 15 Whitman St, Dorchester

15 Whitman Street, Dorchester MA – $595,000

Expansive two-family home offering quality finishes and peace of mind, to make you love coming home.

Designed and built to Oxbow’s high standards of elegant, efficient and smart. This home combines vibrant exterior detailing, thoughtful interior elements that anticipate the need for privacy and the opportunity for entertainment with the newest systems, energy efficiency, and materials found only in new construction. We want you to love coming home.

First Floor Unit offers 2 bedrooms with granite counter tops, hardwood floors, stainless steel appliances and much more.

Owner’s Unit offers 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, stainless steel appliances, granite counter tops, hardwood floors, in-unit laundry, expansive finished attic space. This unit provides the perfect opportunity to let your imagination run free with numerous options for the attic space. Property comes with highly sought after off street parking.

Property Specifications

3,680 square feet of living space

2 Bedroom/1 Bath First Floor Unit: 1,220sf

3 Bedroom/2 Bath Upper Floor Unit: 2,460sf

Full unfinished basement

Fully Equipped Kitchens

Washer and Dryer Hookups

Off Street Parking

Please contact Denisha McDonald for more information and to schedule a showing. Denisha@MandrellCo.com or 617-982-3337

15-whitman-first-floor-ff 15-whitman-second-floor-f

 

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Let’s talk about converting your multifamily into condos. What does it entail, who are the people you need to speak to, what are the things that you need to consider? I have a lot of clients that often come to me and say, “I have a two-family, I have a three-family, I have a four-family and there are some condos selling in my neighborhood, and I’m considering instead of selling my multifamily as a multifamily, what do you think about converting this building into condos and selling them off individually as condos? A couple things. I’m going to go over five things that you want to consider, five people that you want to speak to and get their advice before you make that final decision.

Number one, the number one person you want to speak to is your local real estate agent, a real estate agent that is versed in the multifamily, in condo sales within your market, within your neighborhood. What you’re trying to find out from that real estate agent is two things. One, “What would my multifamily building sell for if it sold as a whole, as a multifamily building?” The second number is, “If I break this into two units, or three units, what are those individual condos going to sell for?” That seems pretty elementary, pretty straight forward. Of course you want to know that. In addition to that what are the things that need to be done to these condos? What are the quality of the finishes within these condos that are required for the sale?

Again, if I’m renting … Right now if I live in unit one and I’m renting units two and units three, and I have laminate flooring and formica countertops and Home Depot cabinets, is that okay for this neighborhood? Is it a requirement for me to upgrade now to granite, to hardwood flooring, to stainless steel if I’m going to convert these into condos? What is the quality of the finishes needed for me to actually put a finished product on the market and actually have them sell?

Once you get those two comparisons. Let’s throw some numbers out there and let’s say we’re in a Cambridge market, let’s say it’s a three-family unit, and I can sell my multifamily for, let’s say, a million bucks. I’m looking at the condos in the same neighborhood and the condos are selling for let’s say six hundred apiece. This a pretty good spread. You have a million bucks as a multifamily. You have almost 1.8 million dollars in sales as a condo conversion. Most people would say, “Pretty straight forward.”

There’s a couple other considerations that you have, though. Next what I would do is I would talk to my general contractor. There’s a couple different ways … I’m going to give you the five people that you should speak to. The real estate agent I would say is always first and then you can toggle through the next four. I would probably bring in my general contractor next and say, “I’ve spoken to my real estate agent and I’m considering going the condo route. Here are the things that I want to do. Based on what my real estate agent is telling me, I need to probably gut this kitchen and we’re gonna go new flooring, new hardwood. We’re gonna bring in stainless appliances. I want new plumbing. I’m probably gonna change out a couple furnaces in the basement. I’m gonna separate these into different utilities for each unit.

Based on those things, what is that full renovation budget gonna run me?” Have your contractor come in, give them the specs, and then have them give you a proposal, a contracting proposal so you know exactly what you’re getting yourself into. The reason you want to do that is because, again, there’s an $800,000 spread between selling it as a multifamily and selling it as condos, but if you come in and your contractor says it’s gonna cost you about a half a million dollars to convert these into condos, is there still an 800. Now there’s only a $300,000 spread.

The other things you want to consider, $300,000 spread still a lot of money but, again, there are realtor fees, there are three realtor fees because you’ll be selling three condos. There are attorney fees. There would be three attorney fees because you’re selling three condos. There is also a bit of a home warranty, and you as a developer, or you selling these condos also have to make some type of guarantees. It’s not guarantees but some type of warranty to the end buyers. If the utilities break down, if the furnaces break down, those end condo buyers are going to be looking back to you. There are a lot of considerations there.

The next person I would speak to is an architect. The reason you would want to speak to an architect is because when you are going from a multifamily to a condo, in your condo docs you are going to need floor plans and the floor plans are going to lay out specifically which units own how much square footage, and then typically their condo fees are based on the square footage, and their ownership. Everything is kind of laid out in the condo docs and the architect is going to be the person that is going to come in and make sure that all the details of this building are specifically laid out, and then transfer all that to the attorney, which is the next person you would probably want to speak to. The attorney is going to talk to you a little bit about the process of drafting up condo docs, splitting your units into three separate entities, or three separate deeds.

There’s a lot of legals that go into taking one deed, one multifamily, and now dividing it up into three separate living quarters. The attorney is the next person you would want to speak to. You want to make sure that you are on board and fully understanding everything that legally needs to be done to convert these into condos, get your new condo docs, and everything else that goes along with it.

The last person you want to speak to, very important, as well, is your CPA, whoever does your taxes. You really want to make sure that they are versed in the real estate world. You want to make sure that they fully understand capital gains tax. What are my tax consequences for selling this building. Are they any different from selling it … your cost basis is going to be adjusted. Your cost basis is going to be adjusted from depending on how much money you put in, what your renovation budget is. Your renovation budget is going to affect your cost basis. You really want to ask them a lot of questions, your CPA a lot of question about the tax consequences that come with selling property and then your opportunity to sell these three or four condos, two, three condos, as well.

Again, talk to your real estate agent. Ask a lot of questions. Does it make financial sense? Talk to your attorney. What are the legal ramifications? Talk to your CPA. What are the tax ramifications? Talk to your general contractor. What is this going to cost me to get this to a market-ready condo? Last, but not least, talk to your architect about getting your floor plans ready so you can actually present them to your attorney to be included in the condo docs and, again, your realtor would probably want to see those floor plans, as well, because they would actually help the sale of the potential building, as well.

Again, Willie Mandrell, Mandrell Company. Five people that you want to speak to before you consider, or while you’re considering, changing your multifamily into a condo. If I can be of any help, please reach out. Mandrellco.com, m-a-n-d-r-e-l-l-c-o.com, or you can reach us at 617-297-8641. Thanks and have a nice day.

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4 Task You Must Complete to Maximize Your Property Sales Price


 

Hi All, I Just want to go over briefly four things that you can do when you’re selling your multi-family. Your two, your three, your four unit, your residential multi-family property. Four things that you can do to make sure that you maximize the price. That you get the most. When putting that property on the market, you walk away with the most money that you possibly can as a potential seller.

Four things that you can potentially do. Let’s start with number one. You can provide a unit vacant. Why would it be beneficial to you as a seller to provide a unit vacant when selling your multi-family? You have two potential buyers when you’re selling, let’s say a three family property. You have the owner-occupant buyer. Someone who’s going to purchase the property, move into the property, move into one of the units and rent out the other two to supplement their income. Then you have the investor. An owner-occupant buyer is almost always going to pay more for the property, their primary residence, the place that they’re going to live, than a potential investor.

Investor’s going to come in and they’re going to analyze the numbers specifically and strictly and say, “Does this property make sense from a financial standpoint and if it does or it doesn’t, I’m going to make my decision based on that.” An owner-occupant buyer is going to move in and make it their own. It’s the place that they live. There’s an emotional attachment to that place. By you providing a unit vacant, you’re essentially allowing them to move in. Without a unit vacant, essentially if all three units are occupied, only an investor can buy that property from you. Basically you’re eliminating the owner-occupant opportunity if all three units are tenant occupied and there’s not a space for an owner-occupant.

The first thing I would say is I wouldn’t go out and necessarily kick a tenant out, but if there’s a tenant moving out and you’re considering selling somewhere around that same time, you know you have a lease expiring in three or four months, it may be a good time to say let’s put the property on the market while I have this potential vacancy and move in at that time.

Number two. Make obvious repairs. If there are some things that need to be done, you are going to maximize your selling price by making sure that the property is shown in it’s best light. That seems obvious to some people but many people don’t do it prior to selling. Making sure that any appliances that are broken, light fixtures, front door, back door, the front porch, back decks, making sure that those things that are quite obvious as soon as you walk up to the building or as soon as you walk inside a unit, this is clearly not the way it should be. Making sure that those things are done prior to putting your house on the market or prior to putting that property on the market is going to maximize your sale.

Prepare for a spring or summer sale. If you are, let’s say it’s January, 2017 and you are moving into, considering selling, you have about three or four months before that spring market hits, that April, May, you really want to preparing your property for that spring marker or that summer market coming up. The reason you want to ideally sell in the spring or the summer, you have a larger pool of buyers at that particular time. Investors are going to be around all year round. But your owner-occupant buyers, if they’re renting an apartment right now and considering buying, their leases typically end sometime during the summer months. You’re going to have a much larger pool of buyers. People typically like to move during the summer when things are easier and not moving in the snow, especially in a place like New England. Preparing yourself mentally, getting your documentation ready, letting your tenants know about the sale, and making sure that you’re getting those things done during the winter months so when the spring and summer rolls around that your house or your property is prepared for that sale.

Last but not least, overpricing your property. Don’t overprice your property. Price it, I would say accordingly. Talk to your realtor, pull comparable sales, what’s going on in the neighborhood, what makes sense for this particular property compared to other sales. When you overprice the property, what you’ll end up with is potentially a stale listing. A stale listing is something that’s been sitting out there for 60, 90 days and now it’s not getting as much attention as it should be. When you do that you actually tend to get a lower sales price then you would have if you just priced the property appropriately from the beginning and sold it as quickly as possible to the best buyers during this spring or summer market.

Again, providing a unit vacant you’re going to get more money from an owner-occupant than you are from a potential investor. Making the obvious repairs. Making sure that your property is presentable and showing in the best light. Preparing for that spring or summer sale and not overpricing your property. Making sure that your property comes on the market at a reasonable and fair price compared to other similar properties that are selling on the market. If you do these four things, you’ll be sure that your sales price is maximized and you’ll get the most money and put the most money in your pocket after the property is sold.

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Is The Dorchester Multi-family Market Cooling Off? Check Out These Numbers

If you know anything about Dorchester real estate, you probably know it’s been on fire for the last couple years…especially the 2-4 family buildings. But is the market cooling now? Are we at the peak? Check out the sales and rental numbers over the last 6 month and determine for yourself.

Here is Dorchester’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics for the last 6 months.

Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 104

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 3,362

Average Listing Price: $599,789

Average DOM (Days on Market): 51.58 Days

Average Sales Price: $593,745

Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $1,645

Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $1,972

Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $2,211

Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $2,564

 
I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

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On December 14th, 2016 I finally closed on my first rental property! For over a year I have been educating myself as much as possible in real estate investing to one day finally take the plunge. That day finally came. A couple months ago, a property on the MLS cam back on the market. It was a 3-family in Mattapan that needed a decent amount of work to get it up to rental condition. Listed at 390k, I initially tried to get the property at 350k, a price that, once I ran numbers, felt would put me in the best position when it came time to refinance out of my purchasing loan, which I ultimately used hard money for. I submitted the offer with no contingencies, all cash and gave up the buyer’s side commission because I knew on the back end it would be worth it, but that was still not good enough and after some continued negotiation, had to settle for purchasing it at the full asking price. This would create additional challenges, but at the end of the day, if you believe in the deal, you’ll make it work.

Financing the deal was another challenge as I really wanted to find a lender that would finance a percentage of the purchase price and renovations. It was not until it was too late that I found a couple lenders where this was possible. At least for the next one, I will have this component lined up for a more streamlined process. I ultimately had to settle on using hard money, which is great for a short turnaround, but is so incredibly expensive to someone like me who hates to waste money. When it comes to hard money, if you have any other option, please use it instead.

Since the closing, it has been a mad scramble to start the renovations and make sure everyone is working constantly and as efficiently as possible. This is just another thing you will have to do when you slightly overpay for a property. Despite the challenges early on, I couldn’t be happier or more excited to have closed on my first rental property. Every day that passes makes me want to find the next deal more and more. Just always be ready for the more than likely roller coaster ride!

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South Boston’s Multi-Family Sales Are On The Rise. Check Out These Stats!

South Boston Multifamily Sales & Rental Market Report   

Are you a current or aspiring landlord in Massachusetts? No matter how many years you have in the rental business, fully understanding your local market is one the most important thing you can do to ensure your long-term success.  Receiving regular market updates will help you determine when’s it time to buy and when it’s time to sell. It will also allow you to see what your apartments rent for in comparison to your neighbors. Should you be increasing rents? Is now a good time to sell?
Here is South Boston’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics for the last 6 months.

Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 24

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 2,958.00

Average Listing Price: $1,308,736

Average DOM (Days on Market): 49.11 Days

Average Sales Price: $1,256,778

Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $2,189

Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $2,828

Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $3,616

Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $4,178

 
I Want To Know My Home’s Value!
 

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

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4 Documents You Must Have During A Successful Home Sale

I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

I want to talk to you today a little bit about documentation, preparing to sell your multifamily property, any property in between two and 20 units. Typically, we’re talking about two and four units, residential property, but this also applies to larger investment properties as well. Documentation, getting ready to sell. What are you thinking about? What are the documents that you need to gather? I’m giving you right here is four sets of documents that your potential buyers are going to want to ask you about, your realtor is going to ask you about, so you might as well go ahead and get these documents prepared as early as possible.

The first set of documents that you want are your tenant leases and the rent roll. You don’t necessarily have to provide the actual physical copy of your leases to your potential buyers, but what they’re going to want to know is when did those leases start, when do those leases expire, and then the second half of that is what each tenant is paying. That’s a big part of selling a multifamily. It’s a big factor when potential buyers are buying multifamily, are am I going to be able to move into a unit? If one of the tenants are below-market rent, when does that lease expire and when am I now able to increase the rent. Making sure that you’re collecting that information, understanding when are your leases expiring and what each tenant is paying and being able to provide that information to your realtor, so your realtor can provide that to potential buyers.

The second set of items that you’re going to want to collect are systems warranties. Did you recently have the roof changed? Did you recently install a new heating system or a new AC system? Appliances, did you recently install appliances into any of the units within the buildings and are they still within warranty? That is adding value. If you are able to take those warranties and provide those to the new potential buyer and show this refrigerator was installed last year and it’s still under warranty, that is a great way to provide value, so you really want to go out and see if you can collect any warranties that you have from roof to heating systems to appliances, anything else. Systems maintenance. When was the last time that your heating system was serviced? If you have a good maintenance schedule in place, you should have been documenting that over the years and being able to turn that over to a potential buyer is going to create value and give the buyer a sense of ease knowing that the systems were maintained over the years. That is something else that you should be looking for in preparation for selling your multifamily house.

Last but not least, we live in Massachusetts and then throughout the country, 1978 lead paint law. Lead paint is no longer used after the year 1978, but within Boston and a lot of the areas surrounding us, these homes were built 1910, 1920s, so a lot of them still do contain lead paint. If you have lead paint documentation, if your apartments have been lead paint certified, this, again, creates a lot of value, creates a lot of comfort with your potential buyers and if you can provide that documentation right up front to show them that that’s not something that they don’t have to worry about any longer, they can now move children under the age of six in and not have to worry about the lead paint hazard. That is going to create a lot of value for you. It’s going to help you potentially get a quicker sale and for a higher sales price in making sure that you are also collecting that lead paint documentation as well. Four things, tenant lease and rent rolls, warranties, maintenance schedules, and then a lead paint documentation. If you provide those four sets of items, you should be in really good shape to get your property sold.

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Why Your Rental Property Is Worth $50k Less Than Your Neighbors

 I often get the question, “why is my property worth less than my neighbor’s? My neighbor’s house sold for,” in this particular situation, “$600,000. My house is listed at the same thing but I’m not getting the attention or it’s not moving as quickly as my neighbor’s home.” I am going to try answer that question really briefly. Hopefully you like my little graphic here. I am really proud of myself, able to put this together. Not that artistic so it took me a little bit. Hopefully it shows the point pretty clearly.

In this particular instance we’re talking about multi-families. We are talking about, in this particular model, two triple-decker side-by-side. Let’s assume all else is equal. They were built the same year. In the same condition. The tenant base is just as strong. All the systems are working just as effectively or efficiently as one another. All else being equal, the only thing that differs between these two properties is the rental income being produced.

In property number one in our example, you have three units. Each one of them is collecting $1500 per unit. Let’s assume they’re three bedrooms. In property number two, again, all else being equal, you have three bedrooms collecting $2000 a piece. The difference typically that we find between buildings that are almost identical selling for two different prices is the rental income that’s being produced. When buyers buy a rental property, when they buy a multi-family building, a lot of times their intention is to … and not a lot of times, most times, I would say all times, their intention is to collect as much rent as possible to help them reduce their expenses. A lot of times their mortgage qualification relies on the rental income that comes in to help them qualify for a larger purchase.

In this particular example, all else being equal, this particular model, this particular property is worth $550,000. This one is worth roughly $600,000 because of the differences in income. Often you have the seller of property number one saying, “well my house, I’m putting my house on the market and you’re telling me it’s worth $50,000 less than the house two doors down that’s almost identical to mine that sold for 600. Well I know my neighbor and I talked to my neighbor and they’re getting 600 for their property. Why is my house sitting on the market and it’s not getting the attention when we’ve listed it at the same price?”

Again, there are a lot of different factors that go into selling property. The condition, the atmosphere, maybe this person sold in a nice summer market and this is coming onto winter. The rental income is not the only factor that goes into the final price. A lot of times whether you’re talking about multi-family properties, especially the triple-deckers that we have here in New England, the rental income is a big factor and the more rental income that you have being generated by the building, typically the higher the sales price of that building compared to similar buildings.

The point we’re trying to make is more money increases value. More money equals more value. The second point is staying up with the market. Staying up with the market. Staying in touch with what’s going on in your local rental market. By that I mean, typically the reason that you find a difference between these two buildings and what they’re renting for is this person has had long-term tenants. Very good thing, but while these tenants were staying in place, this landlord never systematically went back and increased the rents. The thought process is, and again, to no fault of this person, it’s very common that this happens, is my tenants are great. They’re great people. They don’t give me any trouble. I just want to keep them in place and I want to keep them happy. I’m not going to touch the rent. As long as they’re paying the bills. It is paying the bills that I’m covered. I don’t need much out of it.

Ten years down the road, fifteen years down the road when they’ve gone … when it’s time to now sell, this person has kept up with the market, systematically said, “okay, the three bedroom apartments are now renting for $1800, now they’re renting for $1900.” As tenants move out and new tenants are being replaced, or the tenants that are in place stay there and he systematically increasing two, three percent over time to keep up with the current market rents. When it’s time for these two individuals to sell, they’re cashing out, they’re retiring, they’re moving on, they’re trading up, whatever it is, this person now, despite how nice he was to his tenants or she was to her tenants, over the years is now put themself in a tough situation compared to the person who kept up with the market.

At the end of the day, buyers are going to look at what the property is producing and say, “I’m going to make my determination of value based on,” not solely, but again, in large part on what I can get back. Even if I occupy this unit, we’re looking at it from an investor standpoint, even if we looked at it from an own occupant standpoint and we said we took away this rent, we took away this rent. I now have $4000 to help me with my mortgage. In now have $3000 over here to help me with my mortgage. I can actually not only afford to pay more according to my mortgage broker, but it makes sense for me to pay more for this stream of income. That is exactly what buyers are purchasing. A stream of income.

You as a seller should over the years understand that you want to be systematically raising your rents, systematically increasing your rents, not to be troublesome to your tenants but to make sure when that sale comes sometime in the future that you are prepared for it and that the value of your building has been maximized because the rents have been maximized.

I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

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Malden 2-4 Family Sales Are On The Move… Just Look At The #’s

Malden’s Multifamily Sales & Rental Statistics

Are you a current or aspiring landlord in Massachusetts? No matter how many years you have in the rental business, fully understanding your local market is one the most important thing you can do to ensure your long-term success. Receiving regular market updates will help you determine when’s it time to buy and when it’s time to sell. It will also allow you to see what your apartments rent for in comparison to your neighbors. Should you be increasing rents? Is now a good time to sell?

Here is Malden’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics for the last 6 months.
Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 87
Average Living Area by Square Feet: 2,640.00
Average Listing Price: $543,735
Average DOM (Days on Market): 43.11 Days
Average Sales Price: $534,782
Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $1,453
Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $1,854
Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $2,138
Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $2,345

I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!
Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

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You Should Buy An Investment Property Before Your Primary Home. Here’s Why:

VIDEO: Many would be investors start thinking about investing in real estate too late in the game. Here are a couple few why you should start thinking about real estate investing long before you buy your dream home.

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How Long Will It Take For My Home To Sell?

What is your typical selling timeline and why it’s important to you as a potential seller? If you’re selling a property, you really need to know what’s the next steps and What am I looking forward to. How soon do I need to move out of this property? How soon do I need to turn over the keys to the new buyer?

That’s what I’m going to try to lay out for you. Hopefully it’s pretty clear through my timeline sketch here. When you first put a piece of property on the market and you tell your realtor, let’s go ahead and let’s sell this property, the first thing that your realtor is responsible for doing is marketing and selling the property. Your realtor’s going out and they’re putting the property on the MLS, on Zillow, on Trulia, these different marketing websites, they’re putting it on their own company website. They’re going out there and they’re doing open houses, doing private showings. They’re trying to find that potential buyer for you.

Once that potential buyer is found, and by found what we mean is, a potential buyer has seen the property through an open house, through some type of marketing venue and they’ve now placed an offer on the property. You realtor at the time of receiving that offer is going to come to you, they’re going to negotiate with the potential buyer on your behalf to get the highest sales price with the best terms possible. Once you, the seller, and that potential buyer have agreed to a price, agreed to terms, we call that day one. That is your offer to purchase day, that is the day that the offer, or OTP, has been accepted. That starts your timeline.

You have agreed to sell for a particular price, the buyer has agreed to buy for a particular price, which starts your 45 day approximate timeline. From there, in a typical situation your buyer is going to go into their 10 day home inspection window. Most offers are submitted with a 10 day, standard 10 day window and this allows the buyer to now enter your property, and to your tenant units and to, if it’s a multi-family enter the property to inspect the home with a licensed home inspector, with a contractor, to make sure that the systems are working, to make sure that the roof is okay, to make sure that the windows operate.

They’re going to do a full inspection to make sure that the property is truly what was being presented to them and it is in good working shape. At the end of that 10 day period, you can go with the buyer, it can go in a couple different ways, the buyer can say, I love the property and I want to move forward. That’s what we hope that the buyer does. The buyer can say, there were some things I didn’t really agree with at the potential property, this is not the right property for me, I’m going to back out of this transaction, or the buyer can say yes, I like the property but the price that we agreed to on day one, I don’t feel like that price is appropriate any longer.

The heating system is not working the way it should be, or it’s working but it’s much older than I anticipated. The roof is fine, but it’s much older, it’s 20 years into it’s life and is going to need to be replaced. The buyer has three options, either back out, move forward or renegotiate after that 10 day period. They’ve done their home inspection, let’s say hypothetically we’ve renegotiated and you both, the seller and the buyer, have come to an agreement on price. After that, you as a seller, the buyer, would both hire attorneys and you would go into what’s called the purchase and sales contract, or P & S.

What that does, it solidifies the deal and puts all of the offer information and the final price with the terms into a nice contract that the attorneys can use and it helps us move forward into the sale with a more concrete contract than the offer and purchase. The buyer is also going to put down a larger deposit this time and say yes, this is the property that I want, I’m now going to pursue my mortgage. You’ve had day one, you’ve had your home inspection period, we’ve renegotiated the price, we’ve gone and we’ve hired two attorneys, we’re gone onto purchase and sales.

The buyer is moving forward, the seller is moving forward. Now for you as a seller, from that day 15 to day 45, it’s about a 30 day window, I’ll describe to you a little bit about what the buyer is doing. The buyer in this particular situation is putting their mortgage together. They’re going back to the mortgage company and they’re saying, I found the property that I want, I’m submitting my taxes now, I’m submitting my other documents and the mortgage company is processing all that information to make the distribution, to pay you for the property and to put a lien on the buyer’s property.

You on the other hand, you as the seller, are working with your realtor to do three main things. One is the bank of the buyer is going to send out an appraiser to appraise the property to make sure that the property is worth the amount of money that you have agreed upon. Your realtor is going to make sure that the appraiser has access to the property and that the appraisal is properly done for the bank. The realtor, your realtor is also going to work with the local fire department to make sure that you have a smoke certificate.

Any time a property is being sold, the property needs to come with a certificate from the Boston or local municipality saying that the smoke detectors are in working order. Your realtor is going to help you cover that and you also have to get a final water reading. What are you paying for water bills, at the closing day you want to make sure that all your water bills have been paid and leaving the new buyer, the new owner of that home with a clean balance, a clean water lien with the local municipality or local water department.

Day one, day 10, day 15 and then finally we get to day 45, sometimes there is delays depending on holidays, sometimes it’s bumped up depending on if the buyer can submit their mortgage documents sooner but it’s typically a 45 day timeline from the time that you receive that offer to the time that you get to closing day. At the closing table you would exchange keys with the buyer, you would get the check from the closing attorney for the balance, assuming that your mortgage will be paid off, all the liens will be paid off on the property and whatever is left over you would receive as the potential seller.

Again, when you’re selling a property you typically have about a 45 day timeline from the day that you receive an offer, that offer to purchase is accepted to the day that you close and the new buyer is now the owner of that potential property.

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Do You Know What A Multi-family In Quincy Sells For? Check Out The #’s!

Quincy Multifamily Sales & Rental Market Report
Are you a current or aspiring landlord in Massachusetts? No matter how many years you have in the rental business, fully understanding your local market is one the most important thing you can do to ensure your long-term success. Receiving regular market updates will help you determine when’s it time to buy and when it’s time to sell. It will also allow you to see what your apartments rent for in comparison to your neighbors. Should you be increasing rents? Is now a good time to sell?

Here is Quincy’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics for the last 6 months.
Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 80
Average Living Area by Square Feet: 2,523.00
Average Listing Price: $642,735 (What seller asked for the property)
Average DOM (Days on Market): 45.11 Days (How long it took to sell)
Average Sales Price: $632,778 (What buyers actually paid for the home)
Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $1,445
Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $1,772
Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $2,133
Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $2,533

I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!
Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

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4 Task You Must Complete Before Selling Your Boston Rental Property

Hi guys. Willie Mandrell with the Mandrell Company and today I want to talk to you about five things that you must do prior to selling your multi-family property, your 2- to 4-unit residential or larger investment property. Here are five things that you must do or consider prior to putting that property on the market.

Number one, and the most important thing, is keeping your tenants informed. Nothing can spoil a sale faster than having a tenant who was uninformed about the sale and now objects to that sale, is uncooperative in terms of letting potential buyers in or coordinating with your realtor. You really want to keep your tenants informed about the sale and educating them about the process prior, letting them know that if they’re under lease currently, their leases are going to be respected by the new buyers. If they are worried about rent increases, having that conversation with them prior.

I think the most important thing is also informing them about showing times. We’re going to be having an open house on Saturdays and Sundays from 11 to 1. The realtor is also going to be contacting you for showings in between on Tuesday nights or Wednesday nights. We’re going to try to keep it to a minimum, as not to disturb your quality of living. We don’t really want to interrupt your dinner time or special family events. Keeping that open line of communication with your tenants is going to help the sale move a lot more smoothly than having them uninformed. Making sure you keep your tenants informed, number one.

Have a pre-sale inspection. This is not an absolute necessity, but it can really help move the sale along. If you have a home inspector come in prior to actually putting the house on the market, the home inspector will tell you which appliances are not working correctly, which plugs are not grounded, does your roof look a little older, does the foundation need some type of pointing? If you have a pre-sale inspection, you can learn a lot about the property that you might not have otherwise known, and give you an opportunity to address some of these issues prior to putting the house on the market, and can make the sale go a lot more smoothly than having the reverse happen and having the buyer do the home inspection, and then them coming up with issues and the potential sale falling apart later on.

Number three. Check your smokes. If you are operating with a two- to three- or four-family residential property, the sale cannot take place unless the Boston or local municipal fire department comes in and assures that your smoke detectors are in the proper working order and the proper position within the home as well. Making sure that you’re going around and checking your smokes, that they’re ten feet from every bedroom, that if you own a three-family or above, that the hallways, the common area, the back and front hallways, plus the basement are hardwired to an electric panel. Talk to your realtor about the requirements for the smoke inspection. They are most likely going to coordinate with the municipality, the local fire department and make sure that smoke inspection happens for you. Making sure your smokes are in good working condition, because the sale of that property will not happen if they are not.

Number four, very important as well, talking to your CPA about the sale of that property. If you’re selling that property, are you taking the cash and doing something with it? Are you cashing in? Is it closer to retirement? Your CPA is going to be able to advise you on the tax consequences. The federal government wants their money. The state and local governments also have a stake in the sale of your property as well. Talking to your CPA will give you a good understanding of what’s going to happen with the cash after the sale of that property. It’s something you really want to do and really understand prior, so you can make accommodations. Maybe you want to minimize your tax liability, and talk to your CPA about a potential 1031 exchange, an exchange from one investment property to another. Talking to your CPA is very important.

Last but not least, is you want to talk to an attorney, a good attorney. If you don’t have an attorney that you work with, not everyone does, you can get an excellent real estate lawyer or attorney suggestion from your real estate agent. We, as real estate agents work with attorneys on a regular basis, and we can refer you to someone good that’s in your area that knows your real estate. The reason you want to do that is you really want to have a relationship because as you’re going along and there’s certain paperwork, the offer form, the purchase and sales, the closing itself, the attorney might want to get power of attorney to sign for you at the closing, so you don’t necessarily need to attend. There’s a lot of legal aspects of selling property that you want to talk to your real estate attorney with as well.

THere’s the five things that if you do these five things, you’ll be in very good shape to have your sale move smoothly. Keeping your tenants informed, getting a pre-sale inspection, check your smokes, talk with your CPA, and hire a lawyer. If you do those five things, you’ll be in very good shape for a smooth sale of your multi-family property.

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My First Live Auction Experience

A couple weeks ago, a few of us attended a live auction on a six family apartment building in Dorchester. The property was initially listed on the MLS as an auction, but was ultimately removed, due to what we assumed was demand in registering for the event. A few days before the auction, those of us who were attending, got together to talk about the property and analyze some of the numbers including after repair value, rehab budget, etc. We ultimately decided on an ARV of 1.4 million (this number will come back later) as we started looking ahead to the auction date.

On the day of the auction, during the drive over, we tried to get a feel for how many people might show up to the event. Thinking negatively, I assumed maybe a dozen or so people would show up to compete for the property. We arrived pretty early and therefore, were one of the first people there. As time went on, however, people started arriving, flooding the street with cars and people standing around waiting for the start time. By the time 11:00 rolled around, the time the auction was suppose to start, nearly 50 people had registered as bidders! I think at that point we were more just looking to have a good time and see what the property ultimately sold for.

Funny enough, once the auction started, we were actually the first bid to come in at 600,000, which was the opening bid. Our chances lasted about all of a minute. Within that time the bid had increased to well over 800,000, which priced us out of our max allowable offer. As the price continued to climb, we couldn’t help but chuckle and not understand what was happening since we believed the property to only make sense at a certain value. After about 15 minutes of back and forth bidding between two people, the property finally sold for 1.4 million. Yes, the amount that we determined the property was worth BEFORE the $500,000 in repairs we estimated the property needed!

At the end of the day, we definitely enjoyed the experience and chalked it up to a good learning experience. There will always be more deals to be had, you just have to keep looking for them. Since then, we have made a commitment to attending more auctions to get a sense of whether it is a worthwhile pursuit for deals or not.

Below is a short video of a portion of the bidding process. If you can tell, we were having some fun at this point in the background.

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West Roxbury Multifamily Sales & Rental Market Data

Are you a current or aspiring landlord in Massachusetts? No matter how many years you have in the rental business, fully understanding your local market is one the most important thing you can do to ensure your long-term success.  Receiving regular market updates will help you determine when’s it time to buy and when it’s time to sell. It will also allow you to see what your apartments rent for in comparison to your neighbors. Should you be increasing rents? Is now a good time to sell?

Here are West Roxbury’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics for the last 6 months.

Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 9

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 2,910.00

Average Listing Price: $675,735

Average DOM (Days on Market): 68.11 Days

Average Sales Price: $677,778

Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $1,577

Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $2,004

Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $2,356

Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $2,957

I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

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Do You Have A Bank America Pre-Approval? 4 Reasons You Should Toss It In The Trash!

 Thinking about getting your home loan with the same institution where you do your banking? This may not be the best option for you if you bank with a large commercial lender. Here are 4 reasons why going smaller is better when you shop for a mortgage.

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Save Cash & Do Your Own Home Inspection 1st – 5 Things You Must Look For!

Willie Mandrell of The Mandrell Company breaks down 5 red flags that you can uncover on your own while searching for a home or investment property. You don’t need to spend money on a home inspector if you know what to search for. Discover the 5 “big money” elements of any New England home and how to avoid buying a bad piece of real estate! Hit play and listen in!

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East Boston Multifamily Sales & Rental Market Data

Are you a current or aspiring landlord in Massachusetts? No matter how many years you have in the rental business, fully understanding your local market is one the most important thing you can do to ensure your long-term success.  Receiving regular market updates will help you determine when’s it time to buy and when it’s time to sell. It will also allow you to see what your apartments rent for in comparison to your neighbors. Should you be increasing rents?

Here are East Boston’s multifamily sales and rental market statistics for the last 6 months.  

Total Multi-Family Listings SOLD: 44

Average Living Area by Square Feet: 2,462.00

Average Listing Price: $615,435

Average DOM (Days on Market): 66.98 Days

Average Sales Price: $610,560

Average Rent for 1 Bedroom Units: $1,677

Average Rent for 2 Bedroom Units: $1,943

Average Rent for 3 Bedroom Units: $2,307

Average Rent for 4 Bedroom Units: $2,875

I Want To Know My Home’s Value!

Want to get a FREE Sales and Rental Market Report for your specific area(s)? Just send a quick email to Contact@MandrellCo.com to receive your monthly report. In the title put the words “FREE Boston Sales Statistics” and in the body, add the up to 3 areas you’d like to receive data for. Your name and email will be added to the next monthly reporting cycle. It’s that simple to stay up to date and ahead of the curve!

Please call us directly at 617-297-8641, for custom reports or questions above the data provided.

http://www.EastBostonHomeValues.com

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In our latest series of educational webinars, we explored the topic of self managing your rental properties vs. hiring a property manager. In the fourth and final section of the webinar, we talk about six ways to create more value in Boston rentals, creating a “preventative maintenance schedule” and should you hire a professional and what do they charge.

For more resources and tips on managing your properties, please contact us.

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In our latest series of educational webinars, we explored the topic of self managing your rental properties vs. hiring a property manager. In the third of four sections of the webinar, we talk about protecting your real estate investments and essential landlord/tenant forms that you will need throughout the course of running your business. Many people will say it’s not “if” you will get sued, but “when” so learning about all the strategies that can protect your investments is imperative.

For more resources and tips on managing your properties, please contact us.

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In our latest series of educational webinars, we explored the topic of self managing your rental properties vs. hiring a property manager. In the second of four sections of the webinar, we talk about how you should handle your income, expenses and taxes when it comes to your rental properties. This is another area of focus that is very important when running your business.

For more resources and tips on managing your properties, please contact us.

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In our latest series of educational webinars, we explored the topic of self managing your rental properties vs. hiring a property manager. Even if you initially plan to self manage your properties, it is important to still factor in the cost of hiring a property manager. In the first of four sections of the webinar, we talk about the eight tools every small landlord needs, mastering your rental market and marketing your rental units. Each topic is very important when running your properties like a business and making the best decisions for the business.

For more resources and tips on managing your properties, please contact us.

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Recently we hosted a webinar on the topic of Building Wealth In Your 20’s & 30’s. In the third and final section of the webinar we covered building equity, tax savings and some very important closing thoughts.

For more resources and tips on how to build wealth, please contact us.

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Recently we hosted a webinar on the topic of Building Wealth In Your 20’s & 30’s. In the second section of the webinar we covered saving for retirement, the importance of life insurance and the different types of investments.

For more resources and tips on how to build wealth, please do not hesitate to contact us.

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Recently we hosted a webinar on the topic of Building Wealth In Your 20’s & 30’s. In the first section of the webinar we covered the importance of creating a budget for yourself and family, establishing personal finance goals and how to figure out, and improve on your credit.

For more resources and tips on how to build wealth, please do not hesitate to contact us. 

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